Paper Presentations in Science Hall

Science Hall 035

Time Presentation Abstract
10:30-10:50

Dylan Conroy

Rachel Greenberg

Impossible Attraction: An Exploration of the Ambiguous Relationship between Prospera and Ariel

Shakespeare's The Tempest tells the story of the usurped ex-Duke of Milan, Prospero, cast away upon a deserted island with nothing but his magic, his daughter, and his servant-spirit, Ariel, as well as his adopted slave, Caliban. Eager for revenge, he conjures a great storm to shipwreck his brother Alonso's ship (who had stolen his position) and brings a royal crew upon his island. The relationship between Prospero and Ariel in the play somewhat resembles that of a father and son, or master and pet. In her film adaptation of The Tempest, however, Julie Taymor drastically alters the scope of the play by casting Helen Mirren as a feminized Prospera, which changes the relationship between her and Ariel. This paper explores the consequences of this gender rearrangement and the resulting romantic and sexual effects it yields. Several key scenes are examined, in which Taymor changes none of the dialogue, yet evokes radically different emotional tones than in Shakespeare's written lines.
12:00-12:20

Meagan Hayden

Dr. Jennifer Desiderio

Governess Gone Mad

Henry James's novel, The Turn of The Screw, has mesmerized readers for over a century. Readers debate whether the children in the novel can see the ghosts or if their new governess suffers from insanity. In my paper, Governess Gone Mad, I argue that the ghosts are not ghosts in the literal sense; rather they are manifestations of the governess's subconscious. The governess undergoes an internal battle, keeping the "wrong throbs" in check, while simultaneously trying to raise two children properly. The stress caused by this balance, opens the door to her visions of Peter Quint and Miss Jessel.
12:30-12:50

Morgan Atkins

Dr. Jennifer Desiderio

The True Working Woman

In Ruth Hall, Fanny Fern offers a depiction in a novel of one of America's first working mothers. When Ruth risks losing her children to poverty and her mean-spirited in laws, she fearlessly decides to become a writer in order to reunite her family and to put food on the table. Thus, Fern gives us a portrayal of the "true" working woman, a nineteenth-century woman who works solely for her family. Fern comes to define the true working woman by juxtaposing Mrs. Skiddy and Mrs. Waters, who are greedy, self-interested, and essentially masculine, to Ruth Hall, who epitomizes self-abnegation.
1:00-1:20

Magdalena Azmitia

Dr. Jennifer Desiderio

Same Deal, Different Century: Lack of  Change in the Marriage Institution in  Foster’s The Coquette

Despite being written over one hundred years apart, Hannah Webster Foster's The Coquette and Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth reflect similar views about the marriage system. Same Deal, Different Century: Lack of Change in the Marriage Institution in Foster's The Coquette and Wharton's The House of Mirth discusses how Foster and Wharton critique the marriage system as an economic transaction and a tool for social climbing; thus, they define marriage as a gendered transaction. This essay examines the fatal effect of the patriarchal marriage institution on Lily Bart and Elizabeth Whitman.
1:30-1:50

Katelyn Posenjak

Dr. Jennifer Desiderio

Surviving Society in The House of Mirth

America's upper classes in the late nineteenth century are often illustrated as opulent, careless, and leisured. Edith Wharton's novel, The House of Mirth, looks beyond this luxurious veneer and exposes how Social Darwinism dictated the lives of the upper class. Wharton juxtaposes Judy Trenor's greed, extreme individualism, and social success with Lily Bart's inability to balance her desires for social advancement with her longings for kinship and genuine affection. Ultimately, Wharton reveals that in a society that equates happiness with wealth, a strong need for community can inevitably cause one, like Lily, to fail to adapt and thrive in such a pitiless environment.

Science Hall 036

Time Presentation Abstract
1:00-1:20

Brooke Angelos

Dr. Larry Jones

Rwandan Genocide

The Rwandan Genocide and the genocide of its people were at the hands of the national government. I would like to inform others of the steps leading up to the brutal massacre and how each step impacted the following step and in turn allowed for a 100-day period in which an estimated 500,000-1,000000 Rwandans were killed. I also want to comment on the international reaction to the Rwandan genocide and how, like all genocides, the international community lacks the readiness and fight to allow these atrocities to become the center of the universe.  When human rights are violated it is our duty for these violations, if on a grand scale like mass killing, to become the center of the universe and all attention must remain on it so that human life may be preserved.

Science Hall 064

Time Presentation Abstract
10:30-10:50

Zhasmina Tacheva

Mentor:  Dr. Emma Bojinova

Comparing the Impact of the 2007-09 Financial Crisis on Bulgaria and the United States

This research aims at drawing a comparison between the economies of Bulgaria and the United States not just in terms of procyclical, acyclical and countercyclical variables and lagging, coincident or leading economic indicators but also with regard to social phenomena such as the Occupy Wall Street movement in America and the current nation-wide protests in Bulgaria. Another important objective of this research is to seek ways to devise a socio-economic indicator model that is able to predict the likelihood, and impact, of social pessimism on the ability of a country to recover from an economic crisis.

Science Hall 1004

Time Presentation Abstract
10:00-10:20

Mary Braun

Dr. Mick Cochrane

Snapshots of Narration: A Sampling of Poetry

In this presentation, I will read a small collection of the poems that I have written over the past several years as a Creative Writing major at Canisius. The focus of these poems ranges as to specific subject matter- I cover such themes as international host siblings, family crises, health issues, and the nostalgia felt while growing up- but all of the poems are narrative in form and seek to tell an important story through a small amount of carefully chosen words.
11:00-11:20

Samuel Cochrane

Dr. Eric Gansworth, Janet McNally

The World Doesn’t Care Who It Crushes, It Just Doesn’t Notice: The Failing Technology of Society

Society is supposed to act like a well-oiled machine. People are supposed to do their jobs, like cogs turning in a watch, everyone doing their part to accomplish something greater than the sum of the parts. But this does not always work. Sometimes, the parts do not function as intended and people slip through the cracks. These stories examine the situations where individuals encounter the broken pieces of the society.
11:30-11:50

Victoria Niedzielski

Dr. Mick Cochrane

Just Getting By: A Collection of Short Stories - English Honors Thesis

This collection of connected short fiction focuses on Payson King. Payson King is a character that was born in my first Creative Writing class at Canisius: Introduction to Creative Writing my sophomore year. Since then, I've been carrying her around in my head, waiting for the right time to bring her out to her full potential. These stories are about Payson's quest for meaning in a world where she feels she does not quite fit in. The title, "Just Getting By," a phrase Louie Bulltail says to her, sheds light on how Payson had been living her life. This search culminates during her time in Montana, where her experiences change her. These stories begin with Payson realizing that she needs to live more deliberately, and so she slowly but surely starts to take risks in order to make sense of both herself and the world around her.
12:00-12:20

Samuel Stahl

Dr. Mick Cochrane, Dr. Robert Butler

'I Don't Know What You Take Me As': Me, Jay-Z, and the Poetry of Hip Hop

My presentation will be based on one of the sub-sections of my Honors Thesis, which is a set of interrelated creative nonfiction essays about the experience of reading or listening to various authors, poets and philosophers. This particular section focuses on the work of rapper Jay-Z, touching on the question of how appropriate to analyze hip hop as poetry; running through the stages of his artistic development; and examining in depth his autobiographical narrative strategies. My presentation will primarily fall under the heading of "oral paper", but may also incorporate digital audio or video elements.
3:00-3:50

Thomas Rovito

Dr. John Occhipinti, Dr. Larry Jones

Somalia's Stymied Sons:An Institutional History of Al-Shabaab from Clan Fighting to Globalized Jihad

I plan to present on an institutional history of Al-Shabaab, an Al-Qaeda affiliated organization in Somalia, and the response of the international community in countering this threat through the mechanisms of the Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa and the African Union Mission in Somalia. This paper discusses the history of Islamic political parties in Somalia following independence from Italy, the rise of the Islamic Courts Union, the Ethiopian Invasion, and the civil war in Somalia in the scope of the Global War on Terror. The paper also discusses the Al-Shabaab's funding, interpretation of Sharia law, leadership, division of labor, use of globalization through social media for radicalization abroad, tactics, strategy, and clannism. Furthmore, this paper records Al-Shabaab's foreign policy with states in the Middle East / North Africa region, other non-state actors including the World Food Program and Boko Haram, and complex allegiance with Al-Qaeda.

Science Hall 1013A

Time Presentation Abstract
3:00-3:20

Bridget Sendziak

Dr. Jennifer Desiderio

Beautiful Little Fools

Upon discovering her first-born child is a girl, Daisy Buchanan of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, weeps and says," I'm glad it's a girl. And I hope she'll be a fool  that's the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool" (Fitzgerald 17). Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth illustrates the unfortunate truth of this statement, as the title is derived from a verse in Ecclesiastes: "The heart of the wise is in the house of mourning, but the heart of fools is in the house of mirth" (Ecclesiastes 7:4). New York socialite Lily Bart has been groomed since birth to rely on her physical appearance to attract a wealthy husband  a goal, which becomes increasingly dire after her father is financially ruined. However, Lily turns down suitor after suitor and when we first meet her she is twenty-nine and still unmarried. Within the first chapter, Wharton describes Lily as deeply unhappy with her vocation in life.
3:30-3:50

Lee Ann Kostempski

Dr. Jennifer Desiderio

Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous: Morality in The House of Mirth

In "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous: Morality in The House of Mirth," I explore the parallels between three of Edith Wharton's female characters, Gerty Farish, Carry Fisher, and the protagonist, Lily Bart. These parallels, I argue, signify two possible paths that Lily Bart can choose in her life: marrying rich, symbolized by Carry Fisher, or sacrificing wealth for genuine human connection, symbolized by Gerty Farish. By making Gerty Farish a more prominent figure in Lily's important moments, Wharton concludes that one is better off being poor with loved ones than being in a wealthy but loveless marriage.
4:00-4:20

Michael Hurysz

Dr. Jennifer Desiderio

The Exorcism of Miles Rose

Henry James, in The Turn of the Screw, presents the reader with a chilling tale of spooky specters and demonic children. The governess, at first, has no natural explanation for the appearance of the ghosts.  She soon learns that the ghosts are the former members of the staff, and more importantly, the victims of the demonic children.  Rather than haunting the mansion, the ghosts, I argue in The Exorcism of Miles Rose,  help the governess uncover the truth about the children of Bly. 

Science Hall 1024

Time Presentation Abstract
10:30-10:50

Julia Sementilli

Dr. Philip Reed

'Who's Guilty: Nature or the Doctor?' Bio-Medical Ethics Paper

Active euthanasia has been recognized as the direct killing of an ill and helpless patient, while passive euthanasia refers to letting an extremely ill patient die by discontinuing their life-sustaining treatment. In a famous essay titled "Active and Passive Euthanasia," philosopher James Rachels argues that there is no moral distinction between active and passive euthanasia. I argue against Rachels, defending the moral difference between killing and letting die. The direct act of killing another individual seems deeply immoral, since a physician who selects the active method is choosing to be thoroughly responsible for bringing about the patient's death.
11:00-11:20

Anthony DeMarco

Dr. Philip Reed

TheLife Worth Living

One of the major products of this new technological era is the ability of humans to apply eugenics in order to essentially select children. Julian Savulescu and Guy Kahane welcome these new capabilities by defending the claim made by the principle of Procreative Beneficence (PB). PB refers to a maximizing principle advocating the moral permissibility of parents selecting a child expected to have the most advantaged life. I hesitate to agree with Savulescu and Kahane because PB creates a slippery-slope where parents demand too much of their children to live a worthwhile life.
11:30-11:50

Adadioramma Okonkwo

Dr. Philip Reed

A Case Against the Moral Obligation to Create Children with the Best Chance at the Best Life

The principle of Procreative Beneficence(PB) admonishes people who are trying to create a child to select one whose life is expected to go best out of their possible choices. Savalescu and Kahane apply this principle in their paper, "The Moral Obligation to Create Children with the Best Chance of the Best life." In itself, PB seems like a noble principle to abide by but some of the methods it proscribes in the application of the principle (e.g. IVF) raise significant moral and ethical issues like the moral worth of an embryo and seeing the human person as a product of their disabilities. This paper aims to discuss these issues.
12:00-12:20

Christina DiBaudo

Dr. Philip Reed

The Best Chance of the Best Life: Not an Obligation

The philosophers Julian Savulescu and Guy Kahane argue that as human beings we have an obligation to create children with the best chance of the best life. Looking at the surface of this argument, it is hard to disagree; however, this claim is not entirely plausible. An explanation of the problems their proposal creates as well as an account of my service learning experience at the Buffalo Therapeutic Riding Center will show that while this view is thought-provoking, it fails to fully convince that parents have a moral obligation to actively choose the best child with the best chance of life.
12:30-12:50

Zhasmina Tacheva

Dr. Tanya Loughead, Dr. Emma Bojinova

Is Capitalism Sustainable?

Besides disrupting the stability of global market conditions, the financial crisis of 2007 helped uncover serious chronic environmental and social problems made worse by the globalizing expansion of unfettered neoliberalism. This paper evaluates critically the sustainability of the current capitalist system by examining whether it is economically, environmentally, psychologically and socially sustainable. Using phenomenology as its fundamental method and heterodox economics and critical theory as its primary reference, it questions the ability of basic concepts of mainstream economic theory such as market equilibrium to correctly assess and represent the dynamics of the economy. By exploring contemporary social trends such as the privatization of stress and disease, the increasingly disturbing marketing practices, and the conflation of capitalism, democracy and freedom, it demonstrates how capitalism's immediacy and pervasiveness affect the very psychological constitution of society.
1:30-1:50

Mary Zittel

Dr. Philip Reed

Following the Course of Nature

In "Active and Passive Euthanasia," James Rachels makes the argument that killing is no worse than letting die. This belief makes both passive and active euthanasia appear equal morally. Rachels ignores the fundamental difference between the two that is seen when the cause of death is considered. In passive euthanasia, the physical body itself stops life. In active euthanasia, a third party causes death. The difference in the cause of death brings morals into play and therefore determines which of the two forms is permissible. This distinction voids Rachels' argument that killing is no worse than letting die.  

Science Hall 1028

Time Presentation Abstract
1:30-1:50

Qianyu Qu

Dr. Tanya Loughead

The Equality for LGBTQs in Relation to the Ballroom Culture

This paper aims to clarify the contemporary gender issues in a LGBTQ subculture -- the Ballroom community -- and to understand the LGBTQ demand for equality. Using my personal service learning Ballroom Drag show experience as the baseline, this paper evaluates and discovers this experience through the perspectives of Kristeva's symbolic order and Foucault's analysis of power and discipline, in linkage with Butler's understanding of gender as performative. This paper illustrates the arbitrary understanding of sex, gender and sexual in relation to masquerade, symbolic orders, and social content.
2:00-2:20

Mary Floyd

Dr. Rene DeLaPedraja

Yes we can!: Achieving gender equality within Army combat roles

Women are an integral component of the US armed forces and current represent 15 percent of the 200,000 force.  The 1994 direct ground combat definition and assignment rule presently closes many Army positions to women, particularly within the combat branches of Armor and Infantry.  Women can no longer be denied the opportunity to serve in combat positions in the Army which will be supported by a historical line of successful female military combatants and with the following points female soldiers will be given the opportunity to achieve equality with male soldiers: 1. A historical lineage of female soldiers that spans worldwide and embedded within the history of the US Army
2. A timetable for successful implementation of female combat soldiers
3. How to logistically resource and support the transition
4. How to integrate women into previously all-male units
5. Development of a physical standard for women that does not lower the standard for combat requirements
3:30-3:50

Bridget Sendziak

Dr. Mark Hodin

The Trojan Horse of Comedy

Comedy is the preeminent art form to instigate social change. However, commendation is consistently awarded to tragedies rather than comedies, because tragedy's goal is to lure the audience in with a familiar setting and through twists and turns create an uncomfortable atmosphere by the end. Comedy, on the other hand, starts out with an uncomfortable premise (women running Athens, for example), and ends happily while subtly suggesting the outcome is possible in the real world. In this thesis I will examine comedy's superior ability to instigate social change over tragedy, and how exactly this works. I will analyze three comedic works: Lysistrata, As You Like It, and Modern Family. These all come from vastly different time periods, but employ the same techniques. Comedy takes initial discomfort and turns it into comfort. This the Trojan horse aspect of comedy: it is supposed to be the opposite of reality so the audience can watch characters that they would not normally accept.

Science Hall 1053

Time Presentation Abstract
11:00-11:20

Ryan Coppinger

Dr. Larry Jones

The Anfal Campaign

My presentation will focus on the Iraqi killing of over a million Kurds in the late 1980. My report will look into the history of the Kurds, and the development of what Iraq deemed the Kurdish problem, dating back to the late 1960s and the Ba'athist coup. I will look into the development of this ethnic cleansing and fifth column threat of the Kurds and investigate its development into an all-out massacre of the entire Kurdish population primarily located in Northern Iraq.
11:30-11:50

Daniel Schaus

Dr. Larry Jones

The Role Of Media In The Rwanda Genocide

Mass media heavily influenced the Rwanda Genocide inside the country of Rwanda itself as it promoted genocide.  I want to look into this more and see how much of an affect they had.  I would also like to look into how the media around the world portrayed the Genocide.
12:00-12:20

William Scherer

Dr. Larry Jones

The Origins of Mechanized Massacre: the Beginning of the Final Solution

I want to discuss the origins of the Final Solution and why it changed from a massacre of bullets to a more industrial form of killing. I want to discuss whether it was a predetermined plan or whether it arose out of the circumstances on the ground.
12:30-12:50

Kevin Brick

Dr. Julie Gibert

Imagining the Unimaginable: The gradual development of governmental aerial civil defense in London in the inter-war period

Over the span of nearly twenty years, the Government increased its attention to air raids and their dangers.  The Great War had terrified the civilian population of London, England, as the lack of civil aerial defense mechanisms spawned panic during air raids.  Popular culture in the interwar period exemplified this fear and terror.  In response, the Committee of Imperial Defense created a sub-committee on Air Raid Precautions to initiate precautionary schemes for the civil defense of London from air raids.  Over the next decade and a half, the ARP sub-committee evolved, gaining authority and importance.  After publishing a series of reports and increasing awareness, the Government finally passed the A.R.P. Bill into a law, thus changing verbal plans into concrete action. What started as fear driven talks based on calculations, became full codified law as the first ever A.R.P. legislation in British history