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Core Curriculum

Core Curriculum

Core Capstone Courses:
SPRING 2017

ABEC 419 A: Anthrozoology TR 1:00-2:15pm
Instructor: Paul Waldau
Prerequisites:  Seniors only

ABEC 419 focuses on humankind’s relationships with other animal species. It takes a multidisciplinary approach as students examine our relationships with both domesticated species and wildlife in various nations, regions, communities, and cultures. Through this material, students focus not only on historical trends, scientific investigations and cultural differences, but also on religious perspectives, ethical issues and gender differences. The overarching goal of the course is to help students read, think, discuss and write about their role in our increasingly interconnected world.

BIO 477 A: Plants and Society MWF  12:00-12:50pm
Instructor: Robert Grebenok
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This course explores the various ways in which plants influence human existence.  We will use primary literature and firsthand experience to examine how plants and plant related conditions alter how people interact with each other and their environment.  Topics we will examine include food (GMO and Organic), plant derived medicines (edible vaccines), energy production and global warming.  Through discussions, writing and presentations students will examine the current issues related with the world wide use of plant products.

COM 414A:  Issues in Advertising TR 2:30-3:45pm
Instructor: S. Catherine Foster
Prerequisites:  Seniors only; COM Majors or Professor’s Signature

This course is an exploration of contemporary marketing communication through the social scientific lens of Communication Studies. Students are asked to read Advertising Age, an important weekly magazine published for advertising/ marketing industry professionals. From those readings (as well as supplementary video, other reading, outside speakers and advertising artifacts) they are required to outline and explain current industry news (e.g. new branding initiative from JK Rowling, a hard look at what Facebook knows and tells about us, how Komen is trying to restore its tarnished brand, a reconstitution of agencies at WPP for Colgate-Palmolive.). Each week, each student presents information from assigned readings to the class. Each is also responsible to interpret the potential impact of that story on the industry, the economy, consumers and our popular culture. He/she must critically analyze that behavior in the context of marketing communication and applicable theoretical communication frameworks such as Elaboration Likelihood Model, information theory, commitment and consistency, uses and gratifications, etc. At the same time, students are expected to explore the various core attributes that attach to each of the readings. Beyond that weekly work, every student must select a contemporary advertising topic to explore, research, and subsequently present to the class. This culminates in a research paper that follows APA style.

 

CSC 320 A: The Social Impact of Computing TR 10:00-11:15am
Instructor:  Jeffrey McConnell
Prerequisites:  CS/BIF Seniors only; CSC 212/L

There are many social issues involved in the development of software that students often overlook in their study of computing technology. This course will discuss the issues of diversity, ethics, global awareness, and justice in the context of computing technologies and their impact. Students will explore these issues in class discussions, research, writing, and presentation. The course will use a mini-conference format that will have students write a draft paper that will be reviewed by their peers and then revise that paper into a final form. The course will conclude with student presentation of their final papers.   Due to the advanced computing technological content of the course, CSC 212/L is a prerequisite for the course.

 

DMA 399 A:  Social Documentary M 1:00-3:45pm
Instructor:  James O’Neil
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This capstone course combines viewership of famous social documentaries, with an art survey of documentary photographers and culminates in a written documentary proposal, along with a detailed, oral presentation of the project or, screening of a completed segment of a video or photo documentary. This course will be open to any student who has fulfilled the prerequisite, DMA201: Intro to Digital Media. Below is a description of how certain films viewed as part of the course relate to attributes. Documentary photography will be covered with the help of a textbook (yet to be chosen) that familiarizes students with famous war photographers such as Timothy O’Sullivan, John Heartfield and Eddie Adams, as well as pop documentarians such as Annie Leibovitz.

ENG 365C: Representing World War I
MW 1:00 – 2:15 PM
Instructor: Jane Fisher
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This course surveys a varied range of representations of World War I at its one hundred year anniversary. Required texts include poetry, fiction, autobiography, film and creative non-fiction that will allow us to trace how the modern world we inhabit emerged from the violence of total warfare. Assignments consist of five portfolio homework essays, one midterm essay, one oral research report and a take home final exam.

ENG 365D A:  Post-Colonial Studies TR 11:30 am -12:45 pm
Instructor:  Jean Gregorek.
Prerequisites:  Seniors only

One of the most dramatic world-historical shifts in the twentieth century has been the political liberation of three-fourths of the planet from European domination.  The new 'interdiscipline' of postcolonial studies examines this shift, the complexities of the process of decolonization, and the hybrid culture of peoples and places emerging from European colonial rule.

This course seeks to introduce students to the field of postcolonial studies, drawing primarily on examples from the Islamic world of North Africa and the Middle East.  Through the study of literature, film, and history, as well as of current events, we will investigate encounters between the West and the Middle East, including ways in which twentieth-century European artists and writers have represented these lands, as well as how some Middle Eastern artists and writers have responded to these representations.  Reading and viewing works from North Africa, Afghanistan and Pakistan, we will consider some important postcolonial themes:  the paradoxes of assimilated or hybrid identities; the place of tradition; the public role of women; debates around revolutionary violence; healing the scars of war; the possibilities for cross-cultural understanding; what modernity looks like outside of the West.  This course should be of interest to students of Literature, History, International Relations, Political Science, and Religious Studies. 

 

ENG 365E A: Nazi Germany in Contemporary World Fiction MWF 9:00-9:50am
Instructor: Johanna Fischer
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This course explores various representations of Nazi Germany in contemporary fiction. Students will read four contemporary novels and reflect on their relationship to history, how they are shaped by it, and how they represent it. The focus is not so much on the actual historical event itself, but rather the focus will be on the human experience reflected in the novels themselves. As part of our thinking about this literature we will consider literary phenomena such as reference and self-reflexivity as a way into both the study and the discussion of the important human questions that the novels ask. Furthermore, we will consider the problems and possibilities of historical representation in contemporary fiction.

ENG 365E B: Nazi Germany in Contemporary World Fiction MWF 10:00-10:50am
Instructor: Johanna Fischer
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This course explores various representations of Nazi Germany in contemporary fiction. Students will read four contemporary novels and reflect on their relationship to history, how they are shaped by it, and how they represent it. The focus is not so much on the actual historical event itself, but rather the focus will be on the human experience reflected in the novels themselves. As part of our thinking about this literature we will consider literary phenomena such as reference and self-reflexivity as a way into both the study and the discussion of the important human questions that the novels ask. Furthermore, we will consider the problems and possibilities of historical representation in contemporary fiction.

FAH 481 A: The Art of the Selfie TR 11:30-12:45pm
Instructor: Yvonne Widenor
Prerequisites:  Seniors only

This course presents an overview of the artistic expressions of portraiture limited to those identified as self-portraits. In an age when one is overwhelmed by images of individuals presenting themselves artfully, we are accustomed to these expressions, but the history of self-portraits brings to bear cultural concerns of identity, social standing, and artistic ability. Beginning with the earliest known self-portraits onward, we will discuss the roles ascribed to self-portraits by artists, their patrons, and the 21st century connoisseur.

While works by the most famous self-portraitists Albrecht Dürer, Rembrandt, Vincent van Gogh, and Cindy Sherman will be discussed, we will also explore the use of selfies in contemporary art exhibits at major museums, such as MOMA and lesser known galleries, the Moving Image Contemporary Art Fair in London in 2013, for example.

HIS 414 A: Black Lives Matter: A History of African-American Protest M 6:00-8:45pm
Instructor: Bruce Dierenfield
Prerequisites: Seniors only

Ever since Africans were brought to North America in chains, they have protested their enslavement and, once freed 250 years later, protested racial oppression in order to claim their identity as unique, equal, and empowered members of American society. This Core Capstone course will consider the plight of African Americans in different historical periods, two seemingly antithetical objectives of black protest (assimilation and nationalism), and different methods to improve their lot. Behind leaders, such as Henry Highland Garnet, Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Jo Ann Gibson Robinson, Martin Luther King, Jr., James Farmer, Malcolm X, and Alicia Garza, African Americans have pressed for fundamental human rights. Their methods of protest have included petitions, speeches, conventions, editorials, boycotts, marches, demonstrations, riots, lobbying, and social media. Throughout the course, we will consider the actions of the Black Lives Matter movement that emerged in the wake of Trayvon Martin’s killing by a self-appointed vigilante.

HIS 470 A: American Women in History and Literature TR 1:00-2:15pm
Instructor: Nancy Rosenbloom
Prerequisites: Seniors only

From devilish corsets to the Devil wearing Prada, from separate spheres to glass ceilings, and from Settlement House Cookbooks to Julia Child, American women have had myriad experiences over the past centuries.  This course will explore women's lives from various perspectives using the rich literature written by women of various backgrounds. Sources include fiction and non-fiction and include memoir, autobiography, political speeches, novels, shorts stories, and musical lyrics. Much of the literature reflects on how women have defined and redefined themselves as citizens and as individuals.

HIS 470 AA: American Women in History and Literature MW 1:00-2:15pm
Instructor: Nancy Rosenbloom
Prerequisites: Seniors only

From devilish corsets to the Devil wearing Prada, from separate spheres to glass ceilings, and from Settlement House Cookbooks to Julia Child, American women have had myriad experiences over the past centuries.  This course will explore women's lives from various perspectives using the rich literature written by women of various backgrounds. Sources include fiction and non-fiction and include memoir, autobiography, political speeches, novels, shorts stories, and musical lyrics. Much of the literature reflects on how women have defined and redefined themselves as citizens and as individuals.

HSV 480 A: Be All You Can Be M 1:00-3:45pm
Instructor: Betsy DelleBovi
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This Core Capstone course provides students the opportunity to reflect and practice the knowledge and skills they have acquired through the Canisius College Core Curriculum. Open to all students from all majors, the course explores the many issues related to personal well-being and wellness. Wellness is regarded as a healthy balance between mind, body, and spirit. Approaches to wellness exist in most fields involving human services such as medicine, counseling, education and management. Students will explore important components of environmental safety, healthy food, regular exercise, among other topics.

KIN 494 HYB: Capstone in Kinesiology T 2:30-4:30pm
Instructor: Clancy Seymour
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This seminar is a reflective course that amalgamates topics in Kinesiology with the core curriculum.  Students reflect on their practice, review readings, debate issues, engage in classroom discussions, and participate in service excursions that highlight the diversity, ethical, global awareness, and social justice themes present in their own professional development.

PHI 399 A: Ethics, Justice and the Problem of Poverty R 6:00-8:45pm
Instructor: Heron Simmonds-Price
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This course synthesizes the learning experiences from having completed the components of the Core Curriculum. The course has two parts. The first part takes up consideration of two texts that provide a strong yet accessible background in ethics, justice, and diversity: (1) Kwame Anthony Appiah: Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers; and (2) Michael Sandel: Justice. The second part of the course examines the controversy between two development economists; here the texts are: (3) Jeffrey Sachs The End of Poverty; and (4) William Easterly: The White Man’s Burden: Why the West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good. The emphasis then is on global awareness. Examining the controversy between Sachs and Easterly raises concern about how good will and a commitment to justice by themselves seem not to entail clear and easy solutions to the problem of world poverty.

This course was open to all students from all majors.  We will consider several rival versions of our moral self-understanding and several rival versions of how to address contemporary moral problems. Our goal is to apply these different approaches to the problem of world poverty. Since by current estimates, over 1.7 billion people live in absolute poverty [less than $1.25 per day], how do different economic approaches to these problems entail different conceptions of justice and of the living well? The course considers our position as moral beings in a poverty stricken world.

 

PHI 399 B: Ethics, Justice and the Problem of Poverty R 6:00-8:45pm
Instructor: TBA
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This course synthesizes the learning experiences from having completed the components of the Core Curriculum. The course has two parts. The first part takes up consideration of two texts that provide a strong yet accessible background in ethics, justice, and diversity: (1) Kwame Anthony Appiah: Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers; and (2) Michael Sandel: Justice. The second part of the course examines the controversy between two development economists; here the texts are: (3) Jeffrey Sachs The End of Poverty; and (4) William Easterly: The White Man’s Burden: Why the West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good. The emphasis then is on global awareness. Examining the controversy between Sachs and Easterly raises concern about how good will and a commitment to justice by themselves seem not to entail clear and easy solutions to the problem of world poverty.

This course was open to all students from all majors.  We will consider several rival versions of our moral self-understanding and several rival versions of how to address contemporary moral problems. Our goal is to apply these different approaches to the problem of world poverty. Since by current estimates, over 1.7 billion people live in absolute poverty [less than $1.25 per day], how do different economic approaches to these problems entail different conceptions of justice and of the living well? The course considers our position as moral beings in a poverty stricken world.

PSC 442 A Seminar in International Relations W 2:00-4:45pm
Instructor: Jonathan DiCicco
Prerequisites: Senior IR Majors or Professor's Signature

The seminar focuses on leaders and leadership in international politics. We work together to identify models of leadership that we might strive to emulate, as well as examples of errant behavior and poor leadership that we can try to avoid. In so doing, we repeatedly raise the question, by what criteria -- practical, ethical, and moral -- should we judge “good” and “bad” international leaders? We do not limit our focus to larger-than-life figures like Mahatma Gandhi, Dag Hammarskjöld, Margaret Thatcher, Nelson Mandela, or Pope John Paul II; we also consider and discuss different ways of conceptualizing international leadership and international leaders, including leading states in the international system, regional leaders, and transnational advocacy groups, and we analyze the political structures, motives, and incentives that encourage poor leadership. The seminar requires a solid base of knowledge in international and national politics and is best suited for majors in International Relations and Political Science.

PSC 452 A: Politics of Identity in Europe TR 1:00-2:15pm
Instructor: John Occhipinti
Prerequisites: Seniors only

Nationalism, separatism and European identities. Immigrant communities and responses by Europe’s governments and political parties. Islam in Europe and challenges for identity and security. Lessons for US public policy.