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Core Curriculum

Core Curriculum

Core Capstone Courses:
SUMMER 2016

COM 414: Issues in Advertising
MTR 11:15 am-01:45 pm

Instructor: John Dahlberg 
Prerequisites: Seniors only
Other: Summer Session 1

This course is an exploration of contemporary marketing communication through the social scientific lens of Communication Studies. Students will read Advertising Age, an important weekly magazine published for advertising/ marketing industry professionals, for the latest information about trends in marketing communication, in all media, about virtually any current topic in the advertising and marketing world.  Each week, each student will present information from assigned readings to the class and will be responsible for interpreting the potential impact of the story in that reading on the industry, the economy, consumers and our popular culture. Students must critically analyze that behavior in the context of marketing communication and applicable theoretical communication frameworks such as Elaboration Likelihood Model, information theory, commitment and consistency, uses and gratifications.

KIN 494: Capstone in Kinesiology

Instructor: Lauren Cavanaugh
Prerequisites: Seniors only; Athletic Training, Kinesiology, Sports’ Management majors, or Professor’s signature
Other: Summer Session 2--Completely online

This seminar is a reflective course that amalgamates topics in Kinesiology with the core curriculum. Students reflect on their practice, review readings, debate issues, engage in classroom discussions, and participate in service excursions that highlight the diversity, ethical, global awareness, and social justice themes present in their own professional development.

RST 399B:  Religious Diversity in Buffalo

Instructor: Jonathan Lawrence 
Prerequisites: Seniors only
Other: Summer Session 1—Completely online 

This course will explore the nature of religious diversity in Buffalo through visits to congregations from different religious traditions and discussions of larger themes concerning religious diversity in America and around the world.  During visits to these congregations and other sites, students will videotape worship services (when permitted) and interview clergy and members about their religious beliefs, practices, and experiences of interactions with other religious communities.  Students will conduct background research into the congregations and other sites they are visiting and compose reflections on those visits which will be shared on the website for an on-going project the instructor is conducting.


Core Capstone Courses:
FALL 2016

ABEC 404 A:  Wildlife, Ecology, and Conservation in South Africa

Instructor: Susan Margulis 
Prerequisites: Seniors Only; Prerequisite, ABEC 215

Travel to South Africa for three weeks during the summer to study wildlife ecology and conservation from a more global perspective. Students will have the opportunity to interact and collaborate with students and researchers from the University of Venda and the research staff of the Lajuma Research Centre as part of their field experience. In addition to the scientific components of the course, students will gain a deeper understanding of the cultural, historical and political issues of South Africa, and the realities of conservation in a developing nation, via discussion and reading. The class also involves travel to Kruger National Park. Research projects are completed during the fall semester. Students must apply for this course during FALL of their junior year.

CHM 482: Contemporary Chemical Technology Issues MWF 11:00-11:50 AM 

Instructor: Roberto Gregorius
Prerequisites: Seniors Only

Chemically intensive processes vital to the modern society such as energy, food and materials production, water purification, and waste management, carry with them significant societal implications. Before entering the workforce, students trained in the technical aspects of chemistry must also develop a perspective on professional ethics, and analyze current chemistry and chemical technology intensive societal issues from the perspective of risk assessment and risk management, as well as social justice and ethics with a global perspective. Most of the discussions and content in this course are student-generated, and reflections will be formalized in the form of position papers and oral debates.

COM 414: Issues in Advertising MWF 11:00-11:50 AM

Instructor: John Dahlberg
Prerequisites: Seniors only; COM Majors or Professor’s Signature

This course is an exploration of contemporary marketing communication through the social scientific lens of Communication Studies. Students are asked to read Advertising Age, an important weekly magazine published for advertising/ marketing industry professionals. From those readings (as well as supplementary video, other reading, outside speakers and advertising artifacts) they are required to outline and explain current industry news (e.g. new branding initiative from JK Rowling, a hard look at what Facebook knows and tells about us, how Komen is trying to restore its tarnished brand, a reconstitution of agencies at WPP for Colgate-Palmolive.). Each week, each student presents information from assigned readings to the class. Each is also responsible to interpret the potential impact of that story on the industry, the economy, consumers and our popular culture. He/she must critically analyze that behavior in the context of marketing communication and applicable theoretical communication frameworks such as Elaboration Likelihood Model, information theory, commitment and consistency, uses and gratifications, etc. At the same time, students are expected to explore the various core attributes that attach to each of the readings. Beyond that weekly work, every student must select a contemporary advertising topic to explore, research, and subsequently present to the class. This culminates in a research paper that follows APA style.

ECCH 494 A: Capstone Seminar for Teachers
M 4:30- 7:00 PM

Instructor: Robert M Gregorius 
Prerequisites: Seniors only; Education Majors Only
Other: Hybrid

This course is an exploration of contemporary marketing communication through the social scientific lens of Communication Studies. Students will read Advertising Age, an important weekly magazine published for advertising/ marketing industry professionals, for the latest information about trends in marketing communication, in all media, about virtually any current topic in the advertising and marketing world.  Each week, each student will present information from assigned readings to the class and will be responsible for interpreting the potential impact of the story in that reading on the industry, the economy, consumers and our popular culture. Students must critically analyze that behavior in the context of marketing communication and applicable theoretical communication frameworks such as Elaboration Likelihood Model, information theory, commitment and consistency, uses and gratifications.

EDE 494 A: Capstone Seminar for Teachers
M 4:30- 7:00 PM

Instructor: Robert M Gregorius
Prerequisites: Seniors only; Education Majors Only

This seminar is the reflective course that accompanies student teaching for education majors. Teacher candidates reflect on their student teaching experience, engage in classroom discussions, and complete readings, reflection papers, and a final project related to issues of diversity, global awareness and social justice.

EDS 494 A: Capstone Seminar for Teachers
M 4:30-7:00 PM

Instructor: M Fernanda Astiz 
Prerequisites: Seniors only; Education Majors Only

This seminar is the reflective course that accompanies student teaching for education majors. Teacher candidates reflect on their student teaching experience, engage in classroom discussions, and complete readings, reflection papers, and a final project related to issues of diversity, global awareness and social justice. 

ENG 365C: Representations of World War I
MW 1:00 – 2:15 PM

Instructor: Jane Fisher
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This course surveys a varied range of representations of World War I at its one hundred year anniversary. Required texts include poetry, fiction, autobiography, film and creative non-fiction that will allow us to trace how the modern world we inhabit emerged from the violence of total warfare. Assignments consist of five portfolio homework essays, one midterm essay, one oral research report and a take home final exam.

ENG 365F: Romancing the Grail
MW 10:00- 10:50 AM

Instructor: Johanna Fischer
Prerequisites: Seniors only

The Arthurian romances of the high medieval period continues to capture the imagination of its 21st century readers and has widely influenced contemporary fantasy fiction as well as film.

At the heart of these stories is the quest-more specifically that of the Holy Grail.

In this capstone course we will study these concepts by reading a number of medieval adventures with an eye to how they reflect our modern and individual concepts about those Grail ideals being ever aware that the achievement of these ideals are possible through the great and glorious quest. It is a quest of high adventure fraught with many failures, but ultimately triumphant, evidenced by the fact we still strive to achieve these ideals.

FAH 481 A: The Art of the Selfie 
TR 11:30-12:45pm

Instructor: Yvonne Widenor
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This course presents an overview of the artistic expressions of portraiture limited to those identified as self-portraits. In an age when one is overwhelmed by images of individuals presenting themselves artfully, we are accustomed to these expressions, but the history of self-portraits brings to bear cultural concerns of identity, social standing, and artistic ability. Beginning with the earliest known self-portraits onward, we will discuss the roles ascribed to self-portraits by artists, their patrons, and the 21st century connoisseur.

While works by the most famous self-portraitists Albrecht Dürer, Rembrandt, Vincent van Gogh, and Cindy Sherman will be discussed, we will also explore the use of selfies in contemporary art exhibits at major museums, such as MOMA and lesser known galleries, the Moving Image Contemporary Art Fair in London in 2013, for example.

HIS 421A: Nature and the Art of Angling, Rest, and Contemplation TR 11:30-12:45 PM

Instructor: Richard Bailey
Prerequisites: Seniors only

As an exercise in the genre of cultural history, HIS 421 is an introduction to the history, literary and cultural significance, and practice of fly fishing in America, as well as around the world. In “Nature & the Arts of Angling, Restoration, & Contemplation,” students will also examine the religious themes and the “spiritualization” often attached to fly fishing, which have been expressed in some of the most loved writings in the English language. Students will additionally gain a basic knowledge of fly fishing and an understanding of the ecological, ethical, and justice-related issues surrounding the sport.

HIS 460 A:  The Life and Times of Theodore Roosevelt TR 10:00- 11:15 AM

Instructor: Nancy Rosenbloom
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This course explores the life and times of Theodore Roosevelt (1859-1919), a period that saw the birth of modern America.  If historians sometimes argue that the man makes the times, alternatively they also argue that times make the man.  Roosevelt helped to forge a political culture in response to modernity and articulated a national and international vision that reflected both an understanding of American diversity and the demands of being a player on the world stage.  At the same time, Roosevelt developed a concept of civic virtue that met the ethical standards of what he famously called “the strenuous life,” and, as President from 1901-1908, he used his office as a “bully pulpit” towards the achievement of a more just economic and social order. For this reason, The Age of Theodore Roosevelt focuses on the period that roughly encompasses the political career of one of the most fascinating figures in modern American history.

KIN 494 HYB: Capstone in Kinesiology
T 2:30- 4:29 PM

Instructor: Clancy Seymour
Prerequisites: Seniors only; Athletic Training, Kinesiology, Sports’ Management majors, or Professor’s signature
Other: Hybrid 

This seminar is a reflective course that amalgamates topics in Kinesiology with the core curriculum. Students reflect on their practice, review readings, debate issues, engage in classroom discussions, and participate in service excursions that highlight the diversity, ethical, global awareness, and social justice themes present in their own professional development.

PSC 452A: Politics of Identity in Europe
TR 1:00-2:15 PM

Instructor: John Occhipinti
Prerequisites: Seniors only 

Nationalism, separatism and European identities. Immigrant communities and responses by Europe’s governments and political parties. Islam in Europe and challenges for identity and security. Lessons for US public policy.

PSY 470 A: Controversial Issues in Psychology
MW 3:00- 4:15 PM

Instructor: Debra Instone-Noonan
Prerequisites: Seniors only

Opposing viewpoints about issues involving psychological issues confront us in our daily lives through the media and in our interactions with others.  This course will address some of these contemporary topics in order to illustrate how psychologists address and debate the core issues. As is the case in complex human affairs, there are no easy answers, simple solutions or quick resolutions.   Students will actively explore and present multiple perspectives through small team debates, presentations and persuasive papers.   This is not a course about opinions.  It is a course about using critical thinking and information literacy skills to arrive at answers to some of the most interesting and perplexing issues in psychology today. 

SPE1 494 A:  Capstone Seminar for Teachers
M 4:30-7:00 PM

Instructor: Robert M Gregorius 
Prerequisites: Senior Education Majors Only

This seminar is the reflective course that accompanies student teaching for education majors. Teacher candidates reflect on their student teaching and observations, complete readings, engage in classroom discussions and complete reflections and other projects related to issues of diversity, global awareness and social justice, and how these pertain to their own development as teachers.