Core Curriculum

Core Curriculum

Core Capstone Courses for
Summer 2015

COM 414: Issues in Advertising
MTR 11:15 am-01:45 pm

Instructor: John Dahlberg 
Prerequisites: Seniors only
Other: Summer Session 1 

This course is an exploration of contemporary marketing communication through the social scientific lens of Communication Studies. Students will read Advertising Age, an important weekly magazine published for advertising/ marketing industry professionals, for the latest information about trends in marketing communication, in all media, about virtually any current topic in the advertising and marketing world.  Each week, each student will present information from assigned readings to the class and will be responsible for interpreting the potential impact of the story in that reading on the industry, the economy, consumers and our popular culture. Students must critically analyze that behavior in the context of marketing communication and applicable theoretical communication frameworks such as Elaboration Likelihood Model, information theory, commitment and consistency, uses and gratifications.

HSV 480 Core Capstone: Be All You Can Be
MW 6:00-8:00 pm

Instructor: Betsy DelleBovi
Prerequisites: Seniors only
Other: Summer Session 2

This Core Capstone course provides students the opportunity to reflect and practice the knowledge and skills they have acquired through the Canisius College Core Curriculum. Open to all students from all majors, the course explores the many issues related to personal well-being and wellness. Wellness is regarded as a healthy balance between mind, body, and spirit. Approaches to wellness exist in most fields involving human services such as medicine, counseling, education and management. Students will explore important components of environmental safety, healthy food, regular exercise, among other topics.

PHI 399: Ethics, Justice and the Problem of Poverty

Instructor: John Zeis
Prerequisites: Seniors only
Other: Online Course 

This course synthesizes the learning experiences from having completed the components of the Core Curriculum. The course has two parts. The first part takes up consideration of two texts that provide a strong yet accessible background in ethics, justice, and diversity: (1) Kwame Anthony Appiah: Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers; and (2) Michael Sandel: Justice. The second part of the course examines the controversy between two development economists; here the texts are: (3) Jeffrey Sachs: The End of Poverty; and (4) William Easterly: The White Man’s Burden: Why the West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good. The emphasis then is on global awareness. Examining the controversy between Sachs and Easterly raises concern about how good will and a commitment to justice by themselves seem not to entail clear and easy solutions to the problem of world poverty.

Open to all students from all majors, this core capstone course was partly designed for Business Majors. We will consider several rival versions of our moral self-understanding and several rival versions of how to address contemporary moral problems. Our goal is to apply these different approaches to the problem of world poverty. Since by current estimates, over 1.7 billion people live in absolute poverty [less than $1.25 per day], how do different economic approaches to these problems entail different conceptions of justice and of the living well? The course considers our position as moral beings in a poverty stricken world.


Core Capstone Courses Fall 2015

ABEC 404:  Wildlife, Ecology, and Conservation in South Africa

Instructor: Susan Margulis 
Prerequisites: Seniors Only; Prerequisite, ABEC 215

Travel to South Africa for three weeks during the summer to study wildlife ecology and conservation from a more global perspective. Students will have the opportunity to interact and collaborate with students and researchers from the University of Venda and the research staff of the Lajuma Research Centre as part of their field experience. In addition to the scientific components of the course, students will gain a deeper understanding of the cultural, historical and political issues of South Africa, and the realities of conservation in a developing nation, via discussion and reading. The class also involves travel to Kruger National Park. Research projects are completed during the fall semester. Students must apply for this course during FALL of their junior year. 

CHM 482: Contemporary Chemical Technology Issues MWF 11:00-11:50 AM 

Instructor: Steven Szczepankiewicz
Prerequisites: Seniors Only

Chemically intensive processes vital to the modern society such as energy, food and materials production, water purification, and waste management, carry with them significant societal implications. Before entering the workforce, students trained in the technical aspects of chemistry must also develop a perspective on professional ethics, and analyze current chemistry and chemical technology intensive societal issues from the perspective of risk assessment and risk management, as well as social justice and ethics with a global perspective. Most of the discussions and content in this course are student-generated, and reflections will be formalized in the form of position papers and oral debates.

CLL 400 A: Humanitas

Instructor: Kathryn Williams
Prerequisites: Seniors only; see description below

The range of meaning of the Latin work Humanitas encompasses our notions of education, culture, and literature. The course will be devoted to the study of a particular ancient Latin author—for example, Virgil, Cicero, or Suetonius—, group of authors—for example, Plautus and Terence or Caesar and Sallust—, or genre—for example, philosophy, poetry, or history. Whatever the authors or texts, most of them will be read in the original Latin.

As a result, though the course is not limited to Classics majors, students will be required to have had at least three semesters of ancient Latin. To ensure that this is the case and that those who wish to register have completed or are in the process of completing their core requirements, the permission of the instructor will be required for all who wish to take CLL 400. CLL 400 may count toward the completion of the major or minor in Classics. 

COM 414:  Issues in Advertising
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM

Instructor: John Dahlberg
Prerequisites:  Seniors only; COM Majors or Professor’s Signature

This course is an exploration of contemporary marketing communication through the social scientific lens of Communication Studies. Students are asked to read Advertising Age, an important weekly magazine published for advertising/ marketing industry professionals. From those readings (as well as supplementary video, other reading, outside speakers and advertising artifacts) they are required to outline and explain current industry news (e.g. new branding initiative from JK Rowling, a hard look at what Facebook knows and tells about us, how Komen is trying to restore its tarnished brand, a reconstitution of agencies at WPP for Colgate-Palmolive.). Each week, each student presents information from assigned readings to the class. Each is also responsible to interpret the potential impact of that story on the industry, the economy, consumers and our popular culture. He/she must critically analyze that behavior in the context of marketing communication and applicable theoretical communication frameworks such as Elaboration Likelihood Model, information theory, commitment and consistency, uses and gratifications, etc. At the same time, students are expected to explore the various core attributes that attach to each of the readings. Beyond that weekly work, every student must select a contemporary advertising topic to explore, research, and subsequently present to the class. This culminates in a research paper that follows APA style.

ECCH 494 HYB: Capstone Seminar for Teachers
W 2:00-4:20 PM

Instructor: Lorreine DiCamillo 
Prerequisites: Seniors only; Education Majors Only
Other: Hybrid

This course is an exploration of contemporary marketing communication through the social scientific lens of Communication Studies. Students will read Advertising Age, an important weekly magazine published for advertising/ marketing industry professionals, for the latest information about trends in marketing communication, in all media, about virtually any current topic in the advertising and marketing world.  Each week, each student will present information from assigned readings to the class and will be responsible for interpreting the potential impact of the story in that reading on the industry, the economy, consumers and our popular culture. Students must critically analyze that behavior in the context of marketing communication and applicable theoretical communication frameworks such as Elaboration Likelihood Model, information theory, commitment and consistency, uses and gratifications. 

EDE 494 HYB: Capstone Seminar for Teachers
W 2:00-4:20 PM

Instructor: Lorreine DiCamillo 
Prerequisites: Seniors only; Education Majors Only
Other: Hybrid

This seminar is the reflective course that accompanies student teaching for education majors. Teacher candidates reflect on their student teaching experience, engage in classroom discussions, and complete readings, reflection papers, and a final project related to issues of diversity, global awareness and social justice.

EDS 494 A: Capstone Seminar for Teachers
M 4:30-7:00

Instructor: Roberto Gregorius 
Prerequisites: Seniors only; Education Majors Only

This seminar is the reflective course that accompanies student teaching for education majors. Teacher candidates reflect on their student teaching experience, engage in classroom discussions, and complete readings, reflection papers, and a final project related to issues of diversity, global awareness and social justice.

ENG 365C: Representations of World War I
MW 1:00 – 2:15 PM

Instructor: Jane Fisher
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This course surveys a varied range of representations of World War I at its one hundred year anniversary. Required texts include poetry, fiction, autobiography, film and creative non-fiction that will allow us to trace how the modern world we inhabit emerged from the violence of total warfare. Assignments consist of five portfolio homework essays, one midterm essay, one oral research report and a take home final exam. 

ENG 365E: Nazi Germany in Contemporary World Fiction MW 1:00 – 2:15 PM

Instructor: Johanna Fischer
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This course explores various representations of Nazi Germany in contemporary fiction. Students will read four contemporary novels and reflect on their relationship to history, how they are shaped by it, and how they represent it. The focus is not so much on the actual historical event itself, but rather the focus will be on the human experience reflected in the novels themselves. As part of our thinking about this literature we will consider literary phenomena such as reference and self-reflexibilty as a way into both the study and the discussion of the important human questions that the novels ask. Furthermore, we will consider the problems and possibilities of historical representation in contemporary fiction. 

HIS 450 A: America and the Holocaust
MW 2:00-3:15 PM

Instructors: Nancy Rosenbloom and Larry Jones
Prerequisites: Seniors only; HIS 108 or HIS 213 or HIS 230, or Professor’s Signature

For many historians, the defining moment of the twentieth century is the Holocaust, the systematic and deliberate extermination of an estimated ten to twelve million people, of whom six millions were Jews.  Coming to terms with these traumatic events has challenged historians to explore to what extent the United States did what it could to rescue European Jews or simply stood by in silence.  The Holocaust challenges us to learn from those who bear witness to both the events and their legacy.  This course will examine America’s reaction to the Holocaust both as it unfolded in the events of the 1930s and 1940s and entails both a chronological treatment of United States response to the events of 1933-1948 and an exploration of the lessons and legacies of the Holocaust with regard to the role of the United States at the Nuremberg Trials, changes in American refugee policy after World War II, and the role of the United States in the adoption and implementation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the adoption of the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, and the founding of the state of Israel.      

As a senior capstone, HIS 450 is intended to enrich the student’s core experience.  To that end, it is designed for students to demonstrate their knowledge of and their ability to reflect upon the four knowledge attributes of diversity, justice, ethics, and global awareness and to demonstrate their skills in information literacy, writing, and oral communication.

HIS 460 A:  The Life and Times of Theodore Roosevelt T 2:30-5:00 pm

Instructor: Nancy Rosenbloom
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This course explores the life and times of Theodore Roosevelt (1859-1919), a period that saw the birth of modern America.  If historians sometimes argue that the man makes the times, alternatively they also argue that times make the man.  Roosevelt helped to forge a political culture in response to modernity and articulated a national and international vision that reflected both an understanding of American diversity and the demands of being a player on the world stage.  At the same time, Roosevelt developed a concept of civic virtue that met the ethical standards of what he famously called “the strenuous life,” and, as President from 1901-1908, he used his office as a “bully pulpit” towards the achievement of a more just economic and social order. For this reason, The Age of Theodore Roosevelt focuses on the period that roughly encompasses the political career of one of the most fascinating figures in modern American history.

KIN 494: Capstone in Kinesiology

Instructor: Clancy Seymour
Prerequisites: Seniors only; Athletic Training, Kinesiology, Sports’ Management majors, or Professor’s signature
Other: Hybrid

This seminar is a reflective course that amalgamates topics in Kinesiology with the core curriculum.  Students reflect on their practice, review readings, debate issues, engage in classroom discussions, and participate in service excursions that highlight the diversity, ethical, global awareness, and social justice themes present in their own professional development.

PHI 399 A: Ethics, Justice and Poverty
TR 2:30-3:45 PM

Instructor: Deacon Newhouse
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This course synthesizes the learning experiences from having completed the components of the Core Curriculum. The course has two parts. The first part takes up consideration of two texts that provide a strong yet accessible background in ethics, justice, and diversity: (1) Kwame Anthony Appiah: Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers; and (2) Michael Sandel: Justice. The second part of the course examines the controversy between two development economists; here the texts are: (3) Jeffrey Sachs The End of Poverty; and (4) William Easterly: The White Man’s Burden: Why the West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good. The emphasis then is on global awareness. Examining the controversy between Sachs and Easterly raises concern about how good will and a commitment to justice by themselves seem not to entail clear and easy solutions to the problem of world poverty.

Open to all students from all majors, this core capstone course was partly designed for Business Majors. We will consider several rival versions of our moral self-understanding and several rival versions of how to address contemporary moral problems. Our goal is to apply these different approaches to the problem of world poverty. Since by current estimates, over 1.7 billion people live in absolute poverty [less than $1.25 per day], how do different economic approaches to these problems entail different conceptions of justice and of the living well? The course considers our position as moral beings in a poverty stricken world.

PHI 399 B: Ethics, Justice and Poverty
W 6:00-8:45 PM

Instructor: Heron Simmonds-Price
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This course synthesizes the learning experiences from having completed the components of the Core Curriculum. The course has two parts. The first part takes up consideration of two texts that provide a strong yet accessible background in ethics, justice, and diversity: (1) Kwame Anthony Appiah: Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers; and (2) Michael Sandel: Justice. The second part of the course examines the controversy between two development economists; here the texts are: (3) Jeffrey Sachs The End of Poverty; and (4) William Easterly: The White Man’s Burden: Why the West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good. The emphasis then is on global awareness. Examining the controversy between Sachs and Easterly raises concern about how good will and a commitment to justice by themselves seem not to entail clear and easy solutions to the problem of world poverty.

Open to all students from all majors, this core capstone course was partly designed for Business Majors. We will consider several rival versions of our moral self-understanding and several rival versions of how to address contemporary moral problems. Our goal is to apply these different approaches to the problem of world poverty. Since by current estimates, over 1.7 billion people live in absolute poverty [less than $1.25 per day], how do different economic approaches to these problems entail different conceptions of justice and of the living well? The course considers our position as moral beings in a poverty stricken world.

PSY 365:  Aging in America TR 8:30-9:45 AM

Instructor: Dr. Marguerite Kermis
Prerequisites: Seniors only

This course is a psychology elective which presents an overview of current research in the psychology of adulthood and aging. People enter life with the accumulated experiences gained over six or seven generations-experiences which affect their attitudes, behaviors and resources. Wars, economic downturns, technology and cultural change have shaped the experience of old age for each cohort of the elderly, but have also shaped the unique biographies of individuals. This course will examine the health, intellectual, demographic and social changes that accompany late life. It will examine brain aging and longevity in illness and health. The purpose of the course is to provide a comprehensive overview of aging in America. Discussions, readings, film and musical images of aging will help students understand the way in which society shapes the life course and development of individuals.

SPE1 494 A:  Capstone Seminar for Teachers
M 4:30-7:00 PM

Instructor: Julie Henry 
Prerequisites: Senior Education Majors Only

This seminar is the reflective course that accompanies student teaching for education majors. Teacher candidates reflect on their student teaching and observations, complete readings, engage in classroom discussions and complete reflections and other projects related to issues of diversity, global awareness and social justice, and how these pertain to their own development as teachers.

SPE1 494 HYB:  Capstone Seminar for Teachers
W 2:00-4:20 PM

Instructor: Lorreine DiCamillo 
Prerequisites: Senior Education Majors Only
Other: Hybrid

This seminar is the reflective course that accompanies student teaching for education majors. Teacher candidates reflect on their student teaching and observations, complete readings, engage in classroom discussions and complete reflections and other projects related to issues of diversity, global awareness and social justice, and how these pertain to their own development as teachers.