Economics/Finance

Economics/Finance

Courses & Curriculum

Qualifications

Students must maintain a 2.0 GPA in their major and a 2.0 overall average to graduate with a degree in Economics. All students must complete a minimum of 120 credit hours to graduate.

Advisement

All students should have an advisor in the major and should contact the department directly to have an advisor assigned if they do not already have one. All majors should work closely with their advisor in discussing career expectations, choosing their major electives, developing their entire academic program and planning their co-curricular or supplemental academic experiences.

Curricular Requirements for the Major

Core: All students complete Core Curriculum requirements as part of their overall Canisius education. 

Free Electives

Free electives are courses in addition to the Core Curriculum and major requirements sufficient to reach a minimum of 120 credit hours for graduation. Students may graduate with more but not less than 120 credit hours.

Major Course

One Field of Knowledge 7 Mathematics Course:

Course   Credits
MAT 106
or
MAT 111
or
MAT 115
Calculus for the Non-Sciences

Calculus I

Calculus for Business I
(MAT 115 is recommended over MAT 106)
3

4

4
ECO 101 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
ECO 102 Principles of Microeconomics 3
ECO 205 Intermediate Macroeconomics Analysis 3
ECO 206 Intermediate Microeconomics Analysis 3
ECO 255 Business Statistics I 3
ECO 256 Business Statistics II 3
Economics electives: Five courses at the 300 or 400 level  

Major Electives

Up to 2 of the following courses (with a minimum grade of C- in each) may be substituted for ECO elective credit: MAT 112, 211, 219, 222. All Finance courses serve as Economics electives. ECO 455 and additional Mathematics and Accounting courses are strongly recommended for graduate school and the business world.

Major Experiences

The department encourages internship experiences as part of the major and accepts one internship on a pass/fail basis as an Economics elective. Many of our majors have participated in the All-College Honors program and have written honors theses on topics in Economics and Finance.

The Golden Griffin Fund

There’s no better way to learn about the inner workings of capital markets and investment management than via the Golden Griffin Fund (GGF).  This student-run, real-money investment fund bridges the gap between theory and practice.  Students research, create and manage portfolio holdings (a.k.a. stocks).  They then analyze and recommend companies to add to the portfolio. To continually grow the fund, GGF students also solicit new investors.

One hundred percent of students who participate in the Golden Griffin Fund graduate as a Bloomberg certified analyst in equities, fixed-income, commodities and currencies, and find employment after graduation.  Visit the Golden Griffin Fund website to learn more. 

Additional Course Considerations

Economics majors may also obtain a concentration in Finance by using Economics electives to take the following courses: FIN 201, FIN 311, FIN 312, FIN 414, and any FIN elective at the 300 or 400 level. This specialization is appropriate for students who wish to make a career in banking or finance. These students should also use free electives to take accounting courses.

Recommended Semester Schedule for Major Course Requirements

Year Fall Semester Spring Semester
Freshman FYS 101 (3 credits) ENG 101 (3 credits)
  ECO 101 (3 credits) ECO 102 (3 credits)
  MAT 105 (3 credits) or MAT 115 (4 credits) or MAT 111 MAT 106 (3 credits) or Free Elective
if MAT 115/111
  RST 101 (3 credits) PHI 101 (3 credits)
  Free Elective Free Elective
     
Sophomore ECO 205 (3 credits) ECO 206 (3 credits)
  ECO 255 (3 credits) ECO 256 (3 credits)
  Field of Knowledge 4 ECO Elective
  Free Elective Free Elective
  Free Elective Free Elective
     
Junior ECO Elective ECO Elective
  Field of Knowledge 1 Field of Knowledge 2
  Field of Knowledge 3 Core Capstone
  Field of Knowledge 6 Free Elective
  Free Elective Free Elective
     
Senior ECO Elective ECO Elective
  Free Elective Free Elective
  Free Elective Free Elective
  Free Elective Free Elective
  Free Elective Free Elective

Dual Majors

Students who wish to expand their educational opportunities may decide to declare a dual major. The decision may be based on career goals or planned graduate studies. Before a student declares a dual major it is important to meet with the appropriate academic departments for advisement. Some dual major combinations can be completed within the minimum 120 credit hour degree requirement, but in some cases additional course work may be required. In order to declare a dual major, the student must complete the appropriate dual major request form and get the signature of each department chairperson and the appropriate associate dean.

The Economics-Mathematics dual major is strongly recommended for the student who is interested in graduate school in either finance or economics. Up to two mathematics courses beyond MAT 111 may be used as economics electives.

Dual majors are also available with history, urban studies, international relations and other areas.

Minors

Students who wish to expand their educational opportunities may decide to declare a minor in addition to their major. The decision may be based on career goals or planned graduate studies. Minors generally range from six to eight required courses. A listing of the minors can be found under the Academic Curricula section of the catalog. Some majors and minors can be completed within the minimum 120 credit hour degree requirement, but in some cases additional course work may be required. Students must complete the appropriate minor request form.

ECONOMICS MINOR (21 credits)

ECO 101 Principles of Macroeconomics (3 credits)
ECO 102 Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits)
ECO 255 Business Statistics I (3 credits)

Economics electives:

Four courses at the 200, 300, or 400 level one of which must be ECO 205 or ECO 206. (12 credits)


Business Economics

Chair: Mark P. Zaporowski, PhD

Introduction


ECONOMICS B.S. PROGRAM - BUSINESS ECONOMICS

The objective of the Economics curriculum is to provide students with an understanding of the economic environment in which they will participate as professionals. The major in Economics requires a sequence of economics courses from which the student is expected to obtain a substantially greater understanding of the economic environment. The Business Economics major program in the Richard J. Wehle School of Business requires, in addition to the major courses, a business core curriculum that provides the student with a common body of business knowledge. It is anticipated that Economics majors will gain sufficient training in methods of economic analysis to be able to help solve the numerous economic problems of society.

Many economics graduates find rewarding and challenging employment in government and industry positions where their specialized training is put to the test and found valuable. Other students choose to deepen their knowledge of economics by attending graduate school. Still others find professional studies in business, law and health sciences more rewarding because of their economics training.

Goals

The goals and objectives of the Economics B.S. major parallels that of the B.A. The differentiation focuses on a career inside a modern corporation, requiring immersion in the Wehle School of Business core curriculum. The goals and objectives can be found here.

Qualifications

Students must maintain a 2.0 GPA in their major and a 2.0 overall average to graduate with a degree in Business Economics. All students must complete a minimum of 120 credit hours to graduate.

Advisement

All students should have an advisor in the major and should contact the department directly to have an advisor assigned if they do not already have one. All majors should work closely with their advisor in discussing career expectations, choosing their major electives, developing their entire academic program and planning their co-curricular or supplemental academic experiences.

Curricular Requirements for the Major

Core

All students complete Core Curriculum requirements as part of their overall Canisius education. View the requirements.

Free Electives

Free electives are courses in addition to the Core Curriculum and major requirements sufficient to reach a minimum of 120 credit hours for graduation. Students may graduate with more but not less than 120 credit hours.

Major Courses

Common body of business knowledge:
Course   Credits
MAT 105  and Finite Mathematics 3
MAT 106 OR Calculus for the Non-Sciences 3
MAT 115  OR Calculus for Business I 3
MAT 111 Calculus I 4
(MAT 115 is recommended over MAT 106. Additional mathematics is recommended if the student is preparing for a graduate program in economics or finance. The student should consult a departmental advisor.)  
ACC 201 Financial Accounting 3
ACC 202 Managerial Accounting 3
ECO 101 Principles of  Macroeconomics 3
ECO 102 Principles of  Microeconomics 3
ECO 255 Business Statistics I 3
ECO 256 Business Statistics II 3
FIN 201 Introduction to Finance 3
ISB 101 Management Technology 3
MGT 101 Introduction to Management 3
MGT 325 Operations Analysis for Business 3
MGT 370 Managerial Environment 3
MGT 446 Managerial Policy Strategy 3
MKT 201 Principles of Marketing 3


Economics major

ECO 205 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3 credits)
ECO 206 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3 credits)

Major Electives

Economics electives [4 courses at the 300 or 400 level]

Up to 2 of the following courses (with a minimum grade of C- in each) may be substituted for ECO elective credit: MAT 112, 211, 219, 222 and/or Accounting courses beyond ACC 202. All 300 and 400 level Finance courses serve as Economics electives.

Major Experiences

The department encourages internship experiences as part of the major and accepts one internship on a pass/fail basis as an Economics elective.

Many of our majors have participated in the All-College Honors program and have written honors theses on topics in Economics and Finance.

Additional Course Considerations

Restricted electives (must be liberal arts): 4 courses

Free Electives: 3 or 4 courses

ECO 455 and additional Mathematics courses are strongly recommended for students wishing to obtain graduate degrees in Economics and Finance.

Year Fall Semester Spring Semester
Freshman FYS 101 (3 credits) ENG 101 (3 credits)
  ECO 101 (3 credits) ECO 102 (3 credits)
  MAT 105 (3 credits) or MAT 115 (4 credits) or MAT 111 MAT 106 (3 credits) or Free Elective
if MAT 115/111
  RST 101 (3 credits) PHI 101 (3 credits)
  Business International Requirement I* Business International Requirement II
     
Sophomore ACC 201 (3 credits) ACC 202 (3 credits)
  ECO 205 (3 credits) ECO 206 (3 credits)
  ECO 255 (3 credits) ECO 256 (3 credits)
  ISB 101 (3 credits) FIN 201 (3 credits)
  Field of Knowledge 4 MGT 101 (3 credits)
     
Junior ECO Elective ECO Elective
  MKt 201 (3 credits) MGT 325 (3 credits)
  Field of Knowledge 1 MGT 370 (3 credits)
  Field of Knowledge 3 Field of Knowledge 2 (Ethics)*
  Field of Knowledge 6 Core Capstone
     
Senior ECO Elective ECO Elective
  A and S Elective MGT 446 (3 credits)
  A and S Elective A and S Elective
  Free Elective A and S Elective
  Free Elective Free Elective

Dual Majors

Students who wish to expand their educational opportunities may decide to declare a dual major. The decision may be based on career goals or planned graduate studies. Before a student declares a dual major it is important to meet with the appropriate academic departments for advisement. Some dual major combinations can be completed within the minimum 120 credit hour degree requirement, but in some cases additional course work may be required. In order to declare a dual major, the student must complete the appropriate dual major request form and get the signature of each department chairperson and the appropriate associate dean.

Dual majors in Economics (B.S.) and Finance are required to take six electives in total. At least two must be Economics electives and at least two must be Finance electives.

2011-2013 Economics Courses


ECO 101 Principles of Macroeconomics          3 credits
Explanation of market system through supply and demand analysis. Measurement of macroeconomic variables and development of economic models to analyze problems of unemployment, inflation and economic growth. Various fiscal and monetary policies will be discussed. (Field 5)

ECO 102 Principles of Microeconomics           3 credits
Explanation of how the market system operates in the context of limited resources. Emphasis on the manner in which consumers and firms determine what to produce, how to produce and for whom to produce. (Field 5)

ECO 205 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis           3 credits
Analysis of demand and supply under various market structures. Cost and production theory, factor pricing, and welfare economics. Prerequisites: ECO 101-102. Fall

ECO 206 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis           3 credits
The determination of national income and product in the short run and long run. Unemployment, inflation, fiscal and monetary policy will be examined in the context of static and dynamic macroeconomic models. Prerequisites: ECO 101-102. Spring

ECO 222 The Apprentice           3 credits
An experiential course in which students “learn by doing” in QuadGear, Canisius’ student-operated on-campus business. The curriculum is specifically designed around the small business and integrates all functional areas of business, from economics and finance to human resources and strategic planning. Students who take this course cannot also use an internship for credit toward the economics major. Consent of instructor required.

ECO 255 Business Statistics I           3 credits
Fundamental concepts of probability and statistics with emphasis on business and economic applications. Organizing and describing data, probability theory, sampling, estimation and hypothesis testing. (Field 7)

ECO 256 Business Statistics II           3 credits
Hypothesis testing, regression analysis, goodness of fit, contingency tables, analysis of variance, time series analysis and forecasting. Prerequisite: ECO 255. (Field 7)

ECO 310 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems           3 credits
An applied introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), a mapping and spatial analysis tool that is widely used in education, government, and industry to solve spatial problems. This course combines lectures and hands-on exercises and provides students the opportunity to use ArcGIS software. Prerequisites: ECO 101-102 or permission of the instructor.

ECO 311 Regional Economics and GIS           3 credits
An analysis of the spatial regional economic patterns in the U.S. with an emphasis on market forces that helped determine the growth and decline of population, employment and income of regional economies through the use of Geographic Information System tools. Prerequisites: ECO 101-102.

ECO 330 Money, Banking and the Economy           3 credits
The connection between financial markets, the economy and the Federal Reserve. Examination of the nature of financial markets, the determination of interest rates, bank management and regulation, money and monetary policy. Emphasis on the impact of monetary policy on the macro economy. This course also serves as a Finance elective. Prerequisites: ECO 101-102.

ECO 333 Economics of Public Issues           3 credits
This course uses economic principles to analyze an array of public policy issues, providing insights into public policy, the effects of policy on the behavior of consumers and producers, the costs and benefits of specific policies and the distribution of these costs and benefits. Current policy debates, such as income inequality and poverty, pollution and environmental issues, health care, international trade and education are analyzed. Prerequisites: ECO 101-102.

ECO 355 Business Analytics and Reporting           3 credits
Using Microsoft Access and Excel, students will learn how to use data analysis, quantitative modeling skills, and enhanced visual presentation to prepare concise reports to meet business performance objectives. Effective oral and written communication will be emphasized. Prerequisites: ECO 255-256.

ECO 401 Public Finance           3 credits
A microeconomic analysis of the role of the public sector in resource allocation. Topics include the theory of market failures, alternative corrective measures for market failures, efficiency/equity analysis of taxes and public expenditure programs. Prerequisite: ECO 102.

ECO 411 State and Local Finance           3 credits
Municipal credit risk and municipal bonds analysis of revenue sources for state and local governments. Public/private sector interaction in urban areas, city-suburban fiscal disparity and competition, state/local government structure, inter-governmental relations. This course also serves as a Finance elective. Prerequisites: ECO 101-102, ECO 256 or equivalent.

ECO 455 Econometrics           3 credits
Estimation and analysis of linear and non-linear regression models using statistical inference. Topics include multicolinearity, heteroskedastic and serially correlated errors, forecasting, dummy variables and simultaneous equations models. Emphasis on analysis of data using EViews statistical software. Prerequisites: ECO 205-206, ECO 256 or equivalent.

ECO 460 International Trade           3 credits
Theory and practice of international trade, why countries trade, what explains the patterns of trade, and what are the effects of trade on a country’s welfare and income distribution. Analysis of international trade policies and their implications. Prerequisites: ECO 101-102.

ECO 497 Internship           3 credits
May be used for Economics elective credit. Pass/Fail only. Requires consent of department chair.

ECO 499 Independent Research           3 credits
Requires consent of department chair.


FINANCE

Chair: Mark P. Zaporowski, PhD

Introduction:
FINANCE B.S. PROGRAM

The analytical tools and problem-solving skills fostered in the Finance major will prove useful to any student who wishes to pursue a career in security analysis, business valuation, corporate management, investments, banking, real estate, insurance or small business. The program provides a concentration designed to help the student prepare for exams for licenses as Chartered Financial Analysts (CFA), Certified Financial Planners (CFP) and Insurance Brokers. A Finance concentration is also available through the Economics major. Interested students should contact the department chair.

Goals of the Major


The goals of the finance major is to prepare its graduates for careers in financial management. Among the specific goals are to provide students:

  • The tools and training necessary to identify and gather information associated with the firm’s activities of capital budgeting and financial decision making.
  • A theoretical basis and consequent tools necessary for valuing securities and firms.
  • An understanding of the principles associated with diversification and the management of investor portfolios to accomplish appropriate risk and return objectives.
  • Finally, an appreciation for the inter-relationships between the above objectives leading to an understanding of the general and guiding principles of modern Finance.

The Golden Griffin Fund: This is an investment fund run by Canisius students under the guidance of designated faculty members and local investment industry advisors. The fund selects students from applicants (usually Juniors) in the Spring for a year-long participation during the Senior year. The student is expected to investigate several firms (under appropriate guidance) for possible inclusion in the portfolio. The final grade depends upon the competency of the analysis rather than the particular recommendation. Students who have completed this experience have had exceptional success in securing high-profile positions

Qualifications

Students must maintain a 2.0 GPA in their major and a 2.0 overall average to graduate with a degree in Finance. All students must complete a minimum of 120 credit hours to graduate.

Advisement

All students should have an advisor in the major and should contact the department directly to have an advisor assigned if they do not already have one. All majors should work closely with their advisor in discussing career expectations, choosing their major electives, developing their entire academic program and planning their co-curricular or supplemental academic experiences.

Curricular Requirements for the Major

Core: All students complete Core Curriculum requirements as part of their overall Canisius education.

Free Electives

Free electives are courses in addition to the Core Curriculum and major requirements sufficient to reach a minimum of 120 credit hours for graduation. Students may graduate with more but not less than 120 credit hours.

Major Courses
Course Title Credits
MAT 106
or
MAT 111
or
MAT 115
Calculus for the Non-Sciences

Calculus I

Calculus for Business I
(MAT 115 is recommended over MAT 106)
3

3

4
ECO 101 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
ECO 102 Principles of Microeconomics 3
ECO 255 Business Statistics I 3
ECO 256 Business Statistics II 3
ECO 255 Business Statistics I 3
ISB 101 Management Technology 3
FIN 201 Introduction to Finance 3
MGT 101 Introduction to Mangement 3
MGT 325 Operations Analysis for Business 3
MGT 370 Managerial Enviroment 3
MGT 446 Managerial Policy Strategy 3
MKT 201 Principles of Marketing 3
Finance major:
FIN 311 Coporate Finance 3
FIN 312 Investments 3
FIN 414 Portfolio Management 3


Major Electives

Four Finance courses at the 300 or 400-level. A maximum of two of the following four accounting courses (with a minimum grade of C- in each) may be substituted for Finance electives: ACC 301, 302, 303, 415.*

Major Experiences

The Golden Griffin Fund is an investment fund run by Canisius students under the guidance of designated faculty members and local investment industry advisors. The fund selects students from applicants (usually Juniors) in the Spring for year-long participation during the Senior year. The student is expected to investigate several firms (under appropriate guidance) for possible inclusion in the portfolio. Students who have completed this experience have had exceptional success in securing high-profile positions.

The department also encourages internship experiences as part of the major and accepts one internship on a pass/fail basis as a Finance elective.

Many of our majors have participated in the All-College Honors program and have written honors theses on topics in Economics and Finance.

Additional Course Considerations

• FIN 455 Computers and Financial Planning (3) is strongly recommended for students wishing to pursue careers in banking, securities analysis or other financial services.
• Additional Mathematics courses are strongly recommended for students wishing to obtain graduate degrees in Economics and Finance.
• Restricted electives (must be liberal arts) 4 courses
• Free Electives (3 or 4 courses)

Recommended Semester Schedule for Major Course Requirements

Year Fall Semester Spring Semester
Freshman FYS 101 (3 credits) ENG 101 (3 credits)
  ECO 101 (3 credits) ECO 102 (3 credits)
  MAT 105 (3 credits) or MAT 115 (4 credits)
or MAT 111
MAT 106 (3 credits) or Free Elective
if MAT 115/111
  RST 101 (3 credits) PHI 101 (3 credits)
  ISB 101 (3 credits) MGT 101 (3 credits)
     
Sophomore ECO 255 (3 credits) ECO 256 (3 credits)
  ACC 201 (3 credits) FIN 201 (3 credits)
  MKT 201 (3 credits) ACC 202 (3 credits)
  Field of Knowledge 4 FIN 201 (3 credits)
  Business International Requirement
I (Two semesters of language or approved regional studies HIS 107-108, 109-110, 131-132)
Business International Requirement
II
     
Junior FIN 311 (3 credits) FIN 414 (3 credits)
  FIN 312 (3 credits) FIN Elective
  MGT 325 (3 credits) Field of Knowledge 1
  Field of Knowledge 2 (Ethics)* A and S Elective
  Field of Knowledge 6 Core Capstone
     
Senior FIN Elective FIN Elective
  FIN Elective MGT 446 (3 credits)
  MGT 370 (3 credits) A and S Elective
  A and S Elective Free Elective
  A and S Elective Free Elective


Dual Majors

Students who wish to expand their educational opportunities may decide to declare a dual major. The decision may be based on career goals or planned graduate studies. Before a student declares a dual major it is important to meet with the appropriate academic departments for advisement. Some dual major combinations can be completed within the minimum 120 credit hour degree requirement, but in some cases additional course work may be required. In order to declare a dual major, the student must complete the appropriate dual major request form and get the signature of each department chairperson and the appropriate associate dean. Dual majors in Business Economics and Finance are required to take six electives in total. At least two must be Economics electives and at least two must be Finance electives.

Notes:
A strong accounting background is desired by many corporations seeking job  candidates with degrees in finance. For those who desire a degree in corporate financial planning, ACC 303 is strongly recommended. FIN 455 is strongly recommended because many entry-level positions in finance require experience with financial modeling using personal computers.

2011- 2013 Finance Courses

FIN 201 Introduction to Finance         3 credits
An introduction to financial analysis, markets, institutions and instruments. Topics covered include financial intermediation, interest rate determination, bond and equity valuation, diversification, financial management and agency issues. Prerequisites: ECO 101-102, ECO 255 or concurrent registration.

FIN 311 Corporate Finance          3 credits
Examination of the procedures and objectives of capital budgeting, the financing of the firm by means of debt and equity, and short-term and long-term financial management. Prerequisite: FIN 201.

FIN 312 Investments          3 credits
Introduction to the institutional features of securities trading, portfolio construction, and the capital asset pricing model. Valuation of equities and bonds and an introduction to various derivative instruments. Prerequisites: FIN 201, ECO 256.

ECO 330 Money, Banking and the Economy          3 credits
See ECO 330 for course description.

ECO 411 State and Local Finance          3 credits
See ECO 411 for course description.

FIN 412 Equity Analysis          3 credits
The analysis and interpretation of financial information and accounting statements in order to assess security risk and return, credit worthiness, financing needs, and the valuation of the firm. Prerequisite: FIN 312.

FIN 414 Portfolio Management          3 credits
An introduction to modern portfolio theory and management. The strategies underlying portfolio construction and evaluation will be examined. The implications of market efficiency on portfolio management will also be considered. Finance Major Assessment will be performed in this class. Prerequisites: FIN 311, FIN 312.

FIN 420 Financial Institutions and Markets          3 credits
Examines the changing world of financial services and the role that financial intermediaries and financial markets are playing in a rapidly changing industry with new benchmarks and success factors. Universal banking as the new model will be analyzed. Prerequisite: FIN 312.

FIN 423 Fixed Income Securities          3 credits
This course discusses the various types of fixed income securities and the markets in which they are traded. Emphasis is placed on contract evaluation, extracting term/risk structure information from pricing, evaluating investment opportunities and (interest rate) risk management. Prerequisite: FIN 312.

FIN 425 Advanced Corporate Finance 3
This course provides a more in-depth treatment of corporate financial management. Topics from the introductory course (FIN 311) are developed in greater detail with emphasis on the underlying theories and more extensive applications to financial decision making. Additional topics beyond the introductory level are presented and discussed. Prerequisite: FIN 311.

FIN 454 Financial Data Management          3 credits
An introduction to collecting, organizing, and using financial data. Includes an introduction to database management using Access and a survey of data mining techniques. Prerequisite: FIN 201.

FIN 455 Computers and Financial Planning          3 credits
Programming in EXCEL via construction of custom functions and macros using Visual Basic. These techniques are applied to a variety of financial models. Prerequisite: FIN 201.

FIN 460 International Finance          3 credits
Examination of the international monetary system, exchange rate determination, capital flows and various exchange rate regimes. Open economy macroeconomic policies will be discussed. Prerequisites: ECO 101-102, FIN 201.

FIN 480 Derivative Securities          3 credits
Analysis of derivative instruments such as options, futures, swaps, warrants, and convertibles. Emphasis on valuation and use of the instruments in hedging. Prerequisites: FIN 311, FIN 312.

FIN 485 - FIN 486 Golden Griffin Fund          6 credits
This is a two-semester sequence in which students become equity analysts and portfolio managers for a real money portfolio of common equity securities (the Golden Griffin Fund “GGF”). Students screen companies in the fall semester and perform detailed financial statement and valuation analyses in the spring semester. Current macroeconomic and financial market developments are discussed weekly. Monthly written reports regarding current GGF portfolio positions are produced by the student managers beginning in the summer. Students taking FIN 485 are expected to continue into the spring semester in FIN 486. Prerequisites: FIN 311, FIN 312. Prerequisites or concurrent registration: FIN 412, FIN 414, FIN 420, FIN 480. NOTE: GGF students are selected during an application process during the student’s junior year.

FIN 497 Internship          3 credits
May be used for Finance elective credit. Pass/Fail only. Requires consent of department chair.

FIN 499 Independent Research          3 credits
Requires consent of department chair.