English as a
Second Language

English as a <br>Second Language

ESL Courses

ESL111: Writing in Context I: Perspectives on Cultures and Ideas

A course in the basics of writing in English. Focus on mastering the writing process as a means to creating effective written work. Some review of the basics of sentence and paragraph structure. Students will primarily work on organizing and developing short essays (1-2 pages) using rhetorical patterns including narration, description, example and comparison and contrast. Emphasis on all ESL concerns including effective word choice, vocabulary, idioms, grammar, sentence structure, etc. (Fall and Spring as needed, 3 credits)

ESL112: Writing in Context II: Perspectives on Cultures and Ideas

Intermediate course in the basics of writing in English mastering the writing process as a means to creating effective written work. Some review of the basics of sentence and paragraph structure. Students will primarily work on organizing and developing short essays (3-4 pages) including expository, analytical and argumentative essays. Includes research based essays. Emphasis on all ESL concerns including effective word choice, vocabulary, idioms, grammar, sentence structure, etc. (Fall and Spring as needed, 3 credits) 

FYS101: Claiming My Space: International Perspectives on Culture and Identity

FYS101 is a seminar style course which emphasizes the production of academic writing through critical analysis of texts. As in any seminar, participants will be actively engaged in discussion and writing in every class session. Students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revision in an effort to master the art of producing a thesis driven essay supported by carefully evaluated, selected and integrated research. The course will include writers workshops including peer review and a focus on information literacy.
The course content focuses on culture and identity and investigates the question, “How does culture and place shape identity?” It is designed for a cross cultural audience, allowing both International and American students the chance to have a conversation about how where we are from influences our view of the world and ourselves. The course is designed for international students who are learning English as a second language (intermediate and advances levels) and seeking a chance to work with American students. In this way, the course is ideal for native English speakers who have a desire to learn more about identity and culture in other parts of the world. The course will consider all the ways in which the place(s) we live or travel and the culture(s) which surrounds us—including virtual culture—shape our identities. (Fall and Spring as needed, 3 credits) 

ESL114: Readings Across the Disciplines I

In this course students will practice pre-reading, scanning, summarizing, paraphrasing and synthesizing of ideas from college level texts. ESL 114 will help students to determine the author’s purpose, intended audience, tone, and context. They will also learn to recognize and understand a work’s thesis (nonfiction) or theme (literary texts) and the rhetorical and literary strategies used to support a work’s thesis and/or develop a work’s theme. Students will study readings from American newspapers and other publications in various academic areas including history, social sciences and religion; readings will have some emphasis on ethics, justice, etc. (Fall, 3 credits) 

ESL115:  Readings Across the Disciplines II

In this course students will practice pre-reading, scanning, summarizing, paraphrasing and synthesizing of ideas from college level texts. ESL 115 will help students to determine the author’s purpose, intended audience, tone, and context. They will also learn to recognize and understand a work’s thesis (nonfiction) or theme (literary texts) and the rhetorical and literary strategies used to support a work’s thesis and/or develop a work’s theme. Students will study readings from American newspapers and other publications in various academic areas including science, philosophy, literature, with emphasis on ethics, justice, etc. (Spring, 3 credits)

ESL116: The Art of Conversation I

In this course students will participate in exercises ranging from role plays, dialogues to brief presentations. Students will demonstrate effective word choice, grammar and accurate communication of meaning. Students will practice listening for main ideas and supporting details, recognize developmental patterns/cues, as well as note taking. This course includes practice in asking and answering questions, understanding and responding appropriately to conversations with a partner and with multiple speakers in small groups. (Fall, 3 credits)

ESL117: The Art of Conversation II

In this course students will participate in exercises ranging from role plays, dialogues to brief presentations. Students will demonstrate effective word choice, grammar and accurate communication of meaning. Students will practice listening for main ideas and supporting details, recognize developmental patterns/cues, as well as note taking. This course includes practice in asking and answering questions, understanding and responding appropriately to conversations with a partner and with multiple speakers in small groups. (Spring, 3 credits)

ESL118: The Art of Oral Presentations

Students in this course will learn to both give and understand oral presentations. Students will give formal presentations in which they will demonstrate clarity of ideas and speech in a vocabulary appropriate to the target audience. Emphasis will be on the effective use of pronunciation, stress, and intonation patterns. Presentations will integrate material from outside sources logically and focus on clearly organized and developed content, including supporting evidence. This course provides reinforcement of how to properly document research. (Spring and Fall, 3 credits)

ESL 449: Independent Study

This course is intended for students needing individualized instruction in ESL when existing ESL coursework will not address the student’s needs. ESL499 is tailored to meet the specialized needs of the student. (Dean’s permission only.)