Environmental
Studies

Environmental <br>Studies

Courses & Curriculum

Core Set of Foundational Knowledge and Skills Courses (8 courses)

Science of Environmental Issues 6 credit hours
***EVST 110/111: Science of Environmental Problems 
(Two Semesters) 
 
Research Methods (Choose one)  3 credit hours
ANT 351: Qualitative Research Methods  
SOC 342: Social Research Methods   
PSC 217: Research Methods
 
Knowledge Areas  12 credit hours
SOC 234: Environment and Society 
RST 342: Theological Ethics and Environmental Justice 
OR 
PHI 244: Environmental Ethics
*ECO 310: Introduction to Geographic 
Information Systems (GIS) 
ECO 101: Principles of Macroeconomics 
 
Senior Capstone  3 credit hours
*EVST 400: Experiential Capstone Course
 
Total 24 credit hours


Specialization Tracks:   15 Credit Hours

Five (5) Courses (4 Elective Courses [may include EVST 315: Professional Seminar in Environmental Studies (1) up to 3 times for 3 credits], and 1 Internship)

  • Environmental Justice
    1. Sociology of the City (SOC 340)
    2. Social Movements and Social Change (SOC 273)
    3. Leadership and Motivation (PSY 329)
    4. Nature, Culture and Interpretation (EVST 250)
  • Environmental Conservation and Administration
    1. Environmental History (EVST 259)
    2. Small Group Communication (COM 302)
    3. Experiential Entrepreneurship (ENT 101)
    4. Special Topics in Natural History (BIO 137)
  • Sustainable Economics
    1. Sustainable Management (ISB 302)
    2. Strategic Sustainable Development (MGT 350)
    3. Special Topics: Operations Global Supply Chain (MGT 337)
    4. *Economics of Green Markets (EVST 300)
  • Environmental Literacy and Public Health
    1. Population and Demographics (SOC 331)
    2. Disease, Myth and Reality (BIO 116)
    3. Environmental Health (BIO 360)
    4. Environmental Communication (COM 348)

*Courses that are in development 

Total:  39 Credit Hours

Structure of the Major:

  • All Environmental Studies (EVST) majors will take a core of eight major requirements including: Science of Environmental Problems (Two Semesters), Environment and Society(SOC234), Environmental Ethics (RST342 or PHI244), Macroeconomics(ECO101), Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (ECO100), and Research Methods (Eg. ANT351, PSC217, SOC342).
  • Students can take classes from any track, but still need an internship, EVST 499.

  • Specialization Tracks include: Environmental Justice, Environmental Conservation and Administration, Sustainable Economics, Environmental Literacy and Public Health. While each specialization requires four electives, one of the electives will be composed of three one credit professional seminars.
  • The one credit professional seminars will be intensive experiences taught by local, regional and international experts in environmental issues. When possible these intensive experiences will be taught by an Expert in Residence. In some instances the seminars will be presented as webinars to allow international presentations. 
  • All EVST majors will complete a Senior year Capstone experience course (EVST 400) in which they will work in the community addressing an environmental issue, in partnership with a private or public environmental organization.
  • Internships opportunities will range from local and regional opportunities to international opportunities through partnerships with well established environmental organizations.

Courses 

EVST 110/111 Science of Environmental Problems I and II           3 credits
The field of environmental studies is motivated by the desire to solve existing environmental problems and avoid future problems. Environmental problems are defined here as problems that result from interactions between humans and the natural environment. This course is designed to provide a conceptual framework for understanding and analyzing environmental problems, an introduction to the scientific basis of key environmental problems, and an introduction to efforts to find scientific solutions to environmental problems. EVST 110, Fall; EVST 111, Spring. Field 6

ANT 351 Qualitative Research Methods         3 credits
Survey of research designs from a qualitative perspective, including field research, participant observation, content analysis, ethnomethodology, and focus groups. Analysis and reporting of qualitative data.

SOC 234 Environment and Society         3 credits
Explores connections between environmental issues and their social causes. Topics of analysis include environmental racism, environmental health, risk and uncertainty, political economy, globalizations and sustainability. Spring. Field 5

SOC 342 Social Research Methods         3 credits
Overview of the major steps in constructing social science research, from developing a research question, operationalization and measurement through data collection and analysis.

PSC 217 Social Research Methods         3 credits
Basic, non-statistical treatment of current techniques and methodologies which characterize political science research.

RST 342 Theological Ethics and Environmental Justice         3 credits
Investigation of the models of theological ethics and the ways in which ethics informs human interaction with the environment. Field 1, Ethics, Oral Communication

PHI 244 Environmental Ethics         3 credits
A study of classical and contemporary moral theories concerning the relationship of human beings to the manifold of their natural surroundings. Field 2, Ethics

ECO 101 Principles of Macroeconomics         3 credits
Explanation of market system through supply and demand analysis. Measurement of important macroeconomic variables and development of economic models to analyze problems of unemployment, inflation and economic growth. Efficacy of various fiscal and monetary policies. Field 2

ECO 310 Introduction to Geographical Information Systems         3 credits
This course is designed as an applied introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) that will introduce students to the concepts and uses of GIS. GIS is an emerging mapping and spatial analysis tool that is widely used in education, government and industry to identify and solve spatial problems. This course will use a combination of lectures and hands-on exercises to provide students the opportunity to apply basic GIS concepts and the fundamentals of spatial analysis using ArcGIS software to a variety of business and economic issues.

Major Experiences:
Students are required to complete an internship with an environmental organization EVST 499. Additionally, students are encouraged to pursue community based learning opportunities as they pertain to their interests and course selection.

Recommended Semester Schedule for Major Course Requirements

EVST 315 Professional Seminar in Environmental Studies         1 credit
A course model consisting of one credit seminar classes, taught by well-known local, regional, and national/international environmental experts, will focus on professionalization and skills for students entering the green economy and career market, as well as those who plan to pursue advanced graduate degrees in this or related areas. Completing three courses provides a three credit hour sequence of classes. We will also incorporate “webinar” and video technology to offer virtual symposium opportunities for our students.

EVST 400 Environmental Studies Capstone         3 credits
Senior Capstone experience course during which students will work in the community addressing an environmental issue, in partnership with a private or public environmental organization. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the foundations of environmental problems in society from an interdisciplinary approach.

EVST 499 Environmental Internship         3 credits
Students will have the opportunity to participate in the daily work of an environmental agency or organization. Students assume responsibility for daily work and, upon agreement with the instructor and site supervisor, a reflection journal, a research paper and 120 hours of work on-site.

Course Descriptions for Specialization Track Electives
Environmental Justice

EVST 250 Nature, Culture and Interpretation         3 credits
Narratives—stories—are one of the primary tools humans use to shape their understanding of themselves and their environment. This course will examine non-fiction, creative non-fiction and fictional narratives to begin to identify the origins and elaborations of the stories we tell ourselves about nature and culture and the dynamic relationship between the two as they impact our own definitions of ourselves and our relationships to our environments. Field 5

SOC 273 Social Movements and Social Change         3 credits
Explores the development of social movements as a force of social change in society. Focus is on theoretical developments in movement theory, as well as explorations of social movements through history. Spring. Field 5, Justice

SOC 340 Sociology of the City         3 credits
Exploration of how people experience and understand city life, how cities grow and develop, and various issues affecting cities today such as suburbanization and urban sprawl. Fall

PHI 245 Animal Ethics         3 credits
An examination of the notion that animals are things, machines, commodities, or resources, and whether sentient beings have intrinsic value and should be respected. Field 2, Ethics

PSY 329 Leadership and Motivation         3 credits
Determinants of leadership effectiveness, factors influencing effectiveness in maintaining leadership position, influencing followers and accomplishing group objectives. Emphasis on communication competencies, group interaction, experiential learning. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or PSY 102, junior or senior status. Spring

Environmental Conservation and Administration

BIO 135 Environmental Biology         3 credits
Introduction to the complex interactions that occur between humans and their environments and how other life forms are impacted by these activities. Field 6

COM 302 Small Group Communication         3 credits
Communication variables in small groups involving task, maintenance, leadership, conformity, shift-to-risk and development. Some emphasis on skill development.

ENT 101 Experiential Entrepreneurship: Creativity, Innovation, Opportunity, and Idea Generation         3 credits
Provides a broad introduction to entrepreneurship and prepares students for developing a mindset for thinking creatively, using innovation, recognizing opportunities and generating entrepreneurial ideas. Other topics include strategic and tactical planning and entrepreneurial activities of an actual business enterprise. Students will participate in the “Business Idea Pitch and Empire Creativity Competition.” Formerly ENT 202. No prerequisite. Open to business and non-business majors including students from the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Education and Human Services.

EVST 235: Environmental Policy and Green Theory         3 credits
This seminar will explore key issues within green political theory. As well as exploring the history and origins of green theory, we will explore some of the key debates such as eco-centrism versus anthropocentrism, animal rights, global justice and our obligations to future generations. Debates within green political theory will include attitudes to the state, market and community from green perspectives, green views of democracy, justice and the “good life.” Throughout, reference will be made to other strands of contemporary political theory such as liberalism, socialism, feminism, nationalism and anarchism.

HIS 259 Environmental History of the United States         3 credits
This course examines the evolving relationship between humans and the nonhuman natural world in the lands now known as the United States. Our course begins in the pre-colonial era with a consideration of the ecological footprint of Native American societies. It ends with the paradoxical present – when “going green” is an undeniably widespread cultural phenomenon, yet environmental regulations and even the science upon which these regulations are based endure an increasingly withering political backlash. Topics to be discussed include, but are not limited to, the ecological implications of the arrival of African and European peoples in North America, westward expansion, the environmental roots and impacts of industrialization, the industrialization of agriculture, the advent of an increasingly complex built environment, the environmental implications of an economy of mass consumption, and the development of ecological consciousness. Field 4

EVST 315 Professional Seminar in Environmental Studies         1 credit
A course model consisting of one credit seminar classes, taught by well-known local, regional, and national/international environmental experts, will focus on professionalization and skills for students entering the green economy and career market, as well as those who plan to pursue advanced graduate degrees in this or related areas. Completing three courses provides a three credit hour sequence of classes. We will also incorporate “webinar” and video technology to offer virtual symposium opportunities for our students.

EVST 400 Environmental Studies Capstone         3 credits
Senior Capstone experience course during which students will work in the community addressing an environmental issue, in partnership with a private or public environmental organization. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the foundations of environmental problems in society from an interdisciplinary approach.

EVST 499 Environmental Internship         3 credits
Students will have the opportunity to participate in the daily work of an environmental agency or organization. Students assume responsibility for daily work and, upon agreement with the instructor and site supervisor, a reflection journal, a research paper and 120 hours of work on-site.

Course Descriptions for Specialization Track Electives
Environmental Justice

EVST 250 Nature, Culture and Interpretation         3 credits
Narratives—stories—are one of the primary tools humans use to shape their understanding of themselves and their environment. This course will examine non-fiction, creative non-fiction and fictional narratives to begin to identify the origins and elaborations of the stories we tell ourselves about nature and culture and the dynamic relationship between the two as they impact our own definitions of ourselves and our relationships to our environments. Field 5

SOC 273 Social Movements and Social Change         3 credits
Explores the development of social movements as a force of social change in society. Focus is on theoretical developments in movement theory, as well as explorations of social movements through history. Spring. Field 5, Justice

SOC 340 Sociology of the City         3 credits
Exploration of how people experience and understand city life, how cities grow and develop, and various issues affecting cities today such as suburbanization and urban sprawl. Fall

PHI 245 Animal Ethics         3 credits
An examination of the notion that animals are things, machines, commodities, or resources, and whether sentient beings have intrinsic value and should be respected. Field 2, Ethics

Environmental Literacy and Public Health

BIO 116 Disease: Myth and Reality         3 credits
Exploration of causation, treatment and prevention of illness. Objective: to increase awareness and understanding of health and disease. Field 6

BIO 135 Environmental Biology         3 credits
Introduction to the complex interactions that occur between humans and their environments, and how other life forms are impacted by these activities. Field 6

SOC 330 Perspectives on Health and Illness         3 credits
The social aspects of health, illness and health care. Epidemiology, the experience of illness, the evolving health care industry, and a comparison of alternative and traditional medicine. Fall

COM 348 Environmental Communication         3 credits
Risk communication encompasses many types of messages and processes. It is the poster warning food workers to handle food safety to prevent the spread of E. coli bacteria. It is the emergency response worker rallying a community to evacuate amidst the rising flood. It is community representatives sitting down with industry to discuss the siting and operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. Risk communication involves people in all walks of life – parents, children, legislative representatives, regulators, scientists, farmers, industrialists, factory workers. It is part of the science of risk assessment and the process of risk management.

PSC 242 International Organizations         3 credits
International and transnational. Intergovernmental and non-governmental. Regional and global. Content areas: political, economic and humanitarian. Advanced Writing Intensive

Sustainable Economics

ENT 101 Experiential Entrepreneurship: Creativity, Innovation, Opportunity, and Idea Generation         3 credits
Provides a broad introduction to entrepreneurship and prepares students for developing a mindset for thinking creatively, using innovation, recognizing opportunities and generating entrepreneurial ideas. Other topics include strategic and tactical planning and entrepreneurial activities of an actual business enterprise. Students will participate in the “Business Idea Pitch and Empire Creativity Competition.” Formerly ENT 202. No prerequisite. Open to business and non-business majors including students from the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Education and Human Services.

ENT 314 Social Entrepreneurship and Not-for-Profit Sector Enterprise         3 credits
This practitioner-oriented course focuses on innovative, values-driven organizations which have explicit civic missions or social purposes and which are most typically associated with the not-for-profit sector of the economy. The chief aims of the course are to help students understand and appreciate the role of the nonprofit sector in creating societal wealth in the economy, to engage participants in institutional efforts to create a good society through exposure to the work of these organization, and to have students consider a variety of forms of involvement available to aspiring entrepreneurs in preparing for leadership roles in their communities. Prerequisites: MGT 101 and MKT 201 or ENT 201 and junior standing. Spring only. Justice

ISB 302 System Dynamics         3 credits
An introduction to systems thinking and system dynamics. Uses tools and computer models to help solve interdisciplinary problems. Using computer-based models or virtual worlds, one can then test the consequences of actions before making actual decisions. Field 5

MGT 440 Global Supply Chain Management         3 credits
This course examines procurement and outsourcing strategies, network configuration, inventory management, supply chain integration, strategic alliances, international issues, coordinated product and supply chain design, demand forecasting, ERP systems, quality and JIT issues and performance measurement in a global supply chain. Prerequisite: MGT 336
or MGT 325. Elective. Fall or Spring. Global Awareness

MGT 479 Current Topics in Global Supply Chain Management     3 credits
Seminar on selected topics with focus on emerging practices and contemporary examples in Global Supply Chain Management. Selected course in Information Systems and Supply Chain Management, International Accounting and Law, E-Commerce and Finance may also be accepted as the equivalent of MGT 479. Consult your departmental advisor. Prerequisite: MGT 336 or MGT 325. Elective. Fall or Spring