Mick Cochrane, PhD

Fitz tells the story of Fitzgerald, a 15-year old who learns that his father, whom he has never met, lives nearby. Fitz begins to follow his father, watch him and study him, until one day he executes a plan to force his father, at gunpoint, to be with him. Over the course of a day, Fitz learns about his father, why he chose to remain distant and what really happened between his mother and father. Fitz’s father learns what sort of boy his son has grown to become.

Read Faculty Profile

Sandra Cookson, PhD

Two Loons Taken for Vultures is a collection of poems that examines the various manifestations of desire in nature, in love and in art.

Read Faculty Profile

Rene De La Pedraja, PhD

The years 1899 through 1941 are remarkable even by Latin America's uniquely turbulent standards. During this time, border disputes and domestic insurrections forcefully shaped the history of this area, as many countries made the rocky transition from agrarian to industrial societies.This volume provides a concise survey of Latin American wars between 1899 and 1941. It compares and contrasts the wars and considers them in light of military theory. It also demonstrates how instrumental wars have been in directing the history of Latin America, and how the United States has often influenced these wars in a decisive manner. Wars examined include border disputes in Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Panama, and Costa Rica, and domestic insurrections in Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, and Nicaragua.

Read Faculty Profile

Rene De La Pedraja, PhD

This book continues the narrative begun by the author in Wars of Latin America, 1899-1941. It provides a clear and readable description of military combat occurring in Latin America from 1948 to the start of 1982. (In an unusual peaceful lull, Latin America experienced no wars from 1942 to 1947.) Although the text concentrates on combat narrative, matters of politics, business, and international relations appear as necessary to explain the wars.  The book traces the many insurgencies in Latin America, as well as conventional wars. Among the highlights are the chapters on the Cuban and Nicaraguan insurrections and on the Bay of Pigs invasion.

 

Read Faculty Profile

Rene De La Pedraja, PhD

This book, continuing the narrative begun by the author in two preceding volumes, provides a clear description of military combat occurring in Latin America for the years from 1982 into mid-2013. Although the text concentrates on combat operations, matters of politics, business and international relations appear as necessary to understand the wars. The book traces the many insurgencies in Latin America as well as conventional wars. Among the highlights are the chapters on the Falklands War and the U.S. invasions of Grenada and Panama.

 

Read Faculty Profile

Bruce J. Dierenfield, PhD

The story of black emancipation is one of the most dramatic themes of American history, covering racism, murder, poverty and extreme heroism. Figures such as Malcolm X and Martin Luther King are the demigods of the freedom movements, both film and household figures.  This major text explores the African American experience of the 20th century with particular reference to six outstanding race leaders. Their philosophies and strategies for racial advancement are compared and set against the historical framework and constraints within which they functioned.  The book also examines the 'grass roots' of black protest movements in America, paying particular attention to the major civil rights organizations as well as black separatist groups such as the Nation of Islam.

Read Faculty Profile

Bruce J. Dierenfield, PhD

Bruce Dierenfield has written a concise and readable guide to the first-and still most important-case that addressed the constitutionality of prayer in public schools. The 6-to-1 decision in Engel v. Vitale (1962) not only sparked outrage among a great many religious Americans, it also rallied those who cried out against what they perceived as a dangerously activist Court.  The case has become known to many as the moment when the U.S. Supreme Court kicked God out of the public schools, supposedly paving the way for a decline in educational quality and a dramatic rise in delinquency and immorality.

Read Faculty Profile

Dennis Duling, PhD

Dennis C. Duling, PhD, delivers a social-scientific criticism of the Gospel of Matthew in his newest book A Marginal Scribe. His Biblical scholarship examines social modeling, marginality, ethnicity, social ranking and literacy, as it relates to Judaism, the Greco-Roman World, and the New Testament – specifically, the Gospel of Matthew. Social-scientific critics use insights from modern sociology, anthropology, economics, political science and social psychology to help better interpret Biblical texts, explains Duling. 

Read Faculty Profile

Jane E. Fisher, PhD

In Jane Fisher’s first book, she contends that war and disease forced changes in gender roles during the early 20th century. Envisioning Disease, Gender and War draws upon the narratives of female writers to examine how women developed an appreciation of their own endurance, and envisioned and accepted their transformed futures following the apocalyptic losses of men during World War I and the influenza pandemic of 1918.

Read Faculty Profile

Eric Gansworth

Eric L. Gansworth’s debut young-adult novel, If I Ever Get Out of Here, is a coming-of-age story about two misfit teens: Lewis comes from a poor family on the Tuscarora Reservation; George is the son of an Air Force officer who moves around a lot. As the boys develop a friendship, they encounter issues of race, poverty and power, and are forced to question their beliefs.  Described as “funny and poignant” (Washington Post) and a book “that can spark all kinds of meaningful conversation” (Los Angeles Times), If I Ever Get Out of Here is Gansworth’s 10th book.

 

Read Faculty Profile

Margaret C. McCarthy, PhD

History of American Higher Education documents the evolution of American colleges and universities, from the colonial era through the early 21st century. Specifically, it details how higher education institutions evolved to prepare leaders with the intellectual and practical skills necessary to build a nation.

Read Faculty Profile

Erin Robinson, PhD

Despite the wealth of information describing social movement activity, studies that focus attention on the intricacies of community relationships within the mobilization process are few. Attention is given in this context to the community struggle to determine parameters of health and safety in the face of environmental contamination. This focused effort draws on detailed analysis of community relationships with the media, science, government and community members themselves. Over the course of five years, sociologist Erin Robinson, has uncovered the ways in which community members come to understand the environmental problems they face. This book offers an explanation for how communities faced with environmental contamination can begin to make sense of that reality.

Read Faculty Profile

Charles Schmidtke, Emeritus Professor

This book takes readers on emeritus professor Charles Schmidtke’s personal journey of grieving. It is a culmination of Schmidtke’s thoughts and experiences about the loss of his daughter, Heidi, at age 21. With a focus on finding balance, health and meaning in life, rather than “chasing for closure” or “going through stages,” Riding the Subway with Heidi provides new perspective on what it means to grieve and creates a healthier dialog for individuals affected by grief.

Mary E. Shea, PhD

Parallel Learning of Reading and Writing in Early Childhood outlines the essential ingredients for early language learning. Written for pre- and in-service early childhood education teachers, the book details why it’s important to provide a balanced language learning environment for young children and offers approaches for children to practice and explore language through reading and writing.

Anne Marie Tryjankowski, EdD

Charter School takes a comprehensive look at the pros and cons of public charter schools, the philosophies that led to their development, and the reasons why parents choose them for their children. The book also considers the important roles that teachers, parents and leaders play in public charter schools, and identifies indicators of success.

Read Faculty Profile

Linda Volonino, PhD & Gregory R. Wood, PhD

Information Technology for Management: Advancing Sustainable, Profitable Business Growth examines global and mobile commerce, IT virtualization, cloud computing, big data and analytics, and social media and metrics. Case studies and real world examples demonstrate how these trends are transforming the business world.  The book’s content was influenced by the authors’ research in the ever-evolving IT field.

Read Faculty Profile

Paul Waldau, PhD

Animal Studies – An Introduction is essential reading for anyone interested the dynamic relationship between humans and animals or the role animals play in society. The book explores how humans have treated animals in the past, how they treat them now and future possibilities for human-animal relationships. Waldau examines these issues from educational, ethical, religious, legal and cultural perspectives.

Read Faculty Profile

Alan G. Weinstein, PhD

Alan G. Weinstein, PhD, addresses how executive coaching leads to behavioral change in Executive Coaching and the Process of Change: A Practitioner’s Guide.  The new book combines the theory of behavior change with real-life examples to demonstrate how successful leaders can achieve positive, long-term, and measurable change for themselves and their employees. Throughout, Weinstein offers first-hand insights into the field and new leadership methods that enable executive coaches to facilitate dialogue that leads to lasting change.  Learn more by clicking here.   

Read Faculty Profile