Philosophy

Philosophy

Philosophy Course Offerings - Fall 2015

The faculty of the Department of Philosophy invites you to join us during Fall 2015 to experience the wonders of contemplation and the challenges of rational examination of matters important to human beings.   

Besides multiple sections of PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy, we offer Field 2 (PHI 200) level courses listed below, as well as a selection of PHI 300 courses.

Please note that successfully completing PHI 101 (or its equivalent in the Honors (HON) program) is a prerequisite for any 200-or-higher level PHI course.

Relevant Abbreviations:

SL = this section includes a required service learning component
TL = this section is a team learning section.  
ONL = this section is conducted online.  See course description for further details.

Credit for the Core Curriculum and Other Programs

Here's a list of the PHI courses offered in Fall 2015 that can count for core curriculum credit and/or credit for other programs.

Core Curriculum Credit Type Fall 2015 PHI Courses that Count for this Credit
Core Curriculum Foundation Courses

PHI 101: Introduction to Philosophy

Field 2 (Philosophy)

All PHI 200-level courses, including:
PHI 225 - Logic
PHI 291 - Philosophy of Art and Beauty

Ethics Attribute PHI 241 - Ethics
PHI 242 - Ethical Issues in Business
PHI 243 - Bio-Medical Ethics
PHI 244 - Environmental Ethics
PHI 245 - Animal Ethics
PHI 252 - Happiness, Virtue, and the Good Life
Justice Attribute PHI 261 - Philosophy of Law
PHI 271 - Philosophy of Human Rights
PHI 273 - Race and Philosophy
PHI 274 - Social & Political Philosophy
PHI 305A - Contemporary Continental Philosophy
Capstone Course PHI 399 - Ethics, Justice, and the Problem of Poverty

 

Other Major / Minor Programs Fall 2015 PHI Courses that Count for this Credit
Ethics (Minor)  PHI 241 - Ethics
PHI 242 - Ethical Issues in Business
PHI 243 - Bio-Medical Ethics
PHI 244 - Environmental Ethics
PHI 245 - Animal Ethics
PHI 252 - Happiness, Virtue, and the Good Life
European Studies

PHI 301A - Ancient Philosophy
PHI 305A - Contemporary Continental Philosophy

Justice (Minor) PHI 261 - Philosophy of Law
PHI 271 - Philosophy of Human Rights
PHI 274 - Social & Political Philosophy
Women & Gender Studies PHI 273 - Race & Philosophy
PHI 274 - Social & Political Philosophy
PHI 305A - Contemporary Continental Philosophy

 

 PHILOSOPHY 101 - Introduction to Philosophy

A Core Curriculum Foundations Course
A
MOSKO MWF 10:00 am - 10:50 am
C
JOHNSTON MWF 10:00 am - 10:50 am
D
RAGUSA MWF 1:00 pm - 1:50 pm
E
MOSKO MWF 11:00 am - 11:50 am
FSL LOUGHEAD MW 10:00 am - 11:15 am
GSL LOUGHEAD MW 9:00 am - 10:15 am
H RAGUSA MWF 12:00 pm - 12:50 pm
I
HAVIS TR 8:30 am - 9:45 am
J HAVIS TR 10:00 am - 11:15 am
K DUGAN TR 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
* TL = Team Learning Course
* SL = Community Based Learning: service learning is required toward the final grade for this section

 

 PHI 200-LEVEL COURSES

Prerequisite: Successful completion of PHI 101
All PHI 200-level courses can count for Field 2 (Philosophy) Credit

 

PHI 225 A - LOGIC - CHANDERBHAN - TR 2:30 pm - 3:45 pm

Logic is the study of formal and informal rules of thought and argumentation.  Because of these rules, we are rationally allowed to proceed from facts we use as evidence to further conclusions.  By studying and working with these patterns, one becomes better at identifying, evaluating, constructing, and employing good arguments.  In this course, we’ll work on sharpening this skill by studying foundational principles of logical argumentation, symbolizing deductive arguments accurately, and constructing demonstrations (i.e., proofs) of an argument’s validity in a system of propositional logic.  As time permits, we will also study rules and patterns of Aristotelian (categorical) logic and its relationship to modern-day predicate logic.  The skills gained in this class will be valuable to anyone taking graduate school entrance exams, including (but not limited to) the LSAT.

 

PHI 241 A -  ETHICS: TRADITIONS IN MORAL REASONING - DJUTH - MWF 9:00 am - 9:50 am
PHI 241 B - ETHICS: TRADITIONS IN MORAL REASONING - DJUTH - MWF 10:00 am - 10:50 am

* Core Curriculum Ethics Attribute
* Ethics Minor Credit

This course is a survey of principal traditions in moral reasoning with attention to moral principles and their applications to contemporary social realities.

 

PHI 241 C (SL) - ETHICS: TRADITIONS IN MORAL REASONING - MOSKO - MW 1:00 pm - 2:15 pm

Core Curriculum Ethics Attribute
Ethics Minor Credit
Service Learning Required (10 hours)

This course examines major ethical theories in the Western philosophical tradition (virtue ethics, natural law theory, deontology, utilitarianism, existentialist ethics and care ethics). In this section, we will put these traditions in dialogue with non-western, feminist and contemporary interpretations and challenges. As part of the course, students will complete 10 hours of community service through the office of Service Learning in order to better understand the real moral and ethical dilemmas we live out every day.

 

PHI 242 A - ETHICAL ISSUES IN BUSINESS - WALSH - M 6:00 pm - 8:45 pm

* Core Curriculum Ethics Attribute
* Ethics Minor Credit                                                                       

The continuing economic downturn is a powerful reminder of the impact that business practices can have on all our lives.  This course asks if the ethics of business is incompatible with the business of ethics.  We examine the ethical implications of the relationships between businesses and their shareholders, employees and society at large.  This course asks the important question of whether ethics is simply an obstacle that must be overcome in the pursuit of profit or if an ethical critique of role of business in society can or should fundamentally constrain the way businesses operate.

 

PHI 243 A - BIO-MEDICAL ETHICS - REED - MWF 10:00 am - 10:50 am
PHI 244 B - BIO-MEDICAL ETHICS - REED - MWF 11:00 am - 11:50 am

Core Curriculum Ethics Attribute
Ethics Minor Credit

A study of important moral issues in relation to current concerns in medicine, medical technology, and the life sciences. 

 

PHI 244 A - ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS - FOREST - TR 10:00 am - 11:15 am

* Core Curriculum Ethics Attribute
* Ethics Minor Credit

A study of classical and contemporary moral theories concerning the relationship of human beings to the manifold of their natural surroundings.

 

PHI 245 A - ANIMAL ETHICS - TBA - F 4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
PHI 245 B - ANIMAL ETHICS - TBA - T 6:00 pm - 8:45 pm

* Core Curriculum Ethics Attribute
* Ethics Minor Credit

In this course, students will learn the philosophical principles (Utilitarianism, Kantian Theory, Virtue Ethics, etc.) which underlie concern for animal welfare/animal rights. Application to  real-world examples will be highly stressed. Students will explore through lecture, discussion, and student presentations the most highly contested issues within animal ethics.  Examples include but are not limited to: scientific research on animals, vegetarianism, factory farming, and zoos. 

 

PHI 252 ASL - HAPPINESS, VIRTUE, AND THE GOOD LIFE - CHANDERBHAN - MWF 10:00 am - 10:50 am
PHI 252 BSL - HAPPINESS, VIRTUE, AND THE GOOD LIFE - CHANDERBHAN - MWF 11:00 am - 11:50 am

Core Curriculum Ethics Attribute
Ethics Minor Credit
Service Learning Required (15 hours)

When you say, “I’m happy,” and say so honestly, what are you saying?  What does this mean?  To answer this question, we will first investigate different theories about the nature of the self to investigate what is meant by ‘I’ in that assertion.  Next, we will consider what is meant by ‘happy’ by studying different theories of happiness.  After this, we’ll see if one can be both morally good (i.e., virtuous) and happy.  The answer varies according to different theories of ethics, several of which we will study - namely, utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics.  Questions at the intersection of these topics will also be investigated through one's service learning experience throughout the semester.  A minimum of fifteen (15) hours of service must be completed for this course.

 

PHI 261 A - PHILOSOPHY OF LAW - DJUTH - MWF 11:00 am - 11:50 am

* Core Curriculum Justice Attribute
* Justice Minor Credit

This course examines the concepts and principles for describing and understanding legal systems, and the relationships between law and legal systems, society and morality.  It serves in particular those pursuing careers in law, criminal justice, public affairs, politics, the social sciences, and philosophy.

 

PHI 271 A (SL) - PHILOSOPHY OF HUMAN RIGHTS - NEWHOUSE - TR 1:00 pm - 2:15 pm

Core Curriculum Justice Attribute
Justice Minor Credit
Service Learning Required 

A study of various issues of human rights in global perspective to ask if human rights transcend political orders, whether they are universally applicable to all human beings, or determined to be culturally relative.

 

PHI 273 A - RACE & PHILOSPHY - HAVIS - TR 11:30 am - 12:45 pm

* Core Curriculum Justice Attribute
Women & Gender Studies Credit

Race remains a factor in how we discuss political, social, and economic conditions in spite of recent claims that we are now in a post-racial era. Whether or not we are aware and despite our desire to erase the negative specter associated with race, the concept remains entrenched in our daily interactions. As inhabitants of the United States, we are forced to navigate confusing, shifting, and sometimes dangerous racial terrain. What factors make it so difficult to move beyond racial categorizations? This course will begin with an examination of how notions of race have been and continue to be constructed. We will utilize philosophical theories and methods to: 1) Analyze concepts of race; 2) Understand how race functions within social, political, and intellectual contexts; 3) Explore how concepts of race intersect with and influence issues associated with gender and class.

 

PHI 274 A - SOCIAL & POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY - JOHNSTON - MWF 9:00 am - 9:50 pm
PHI 274 B - SOCIAL & POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY - SIMMONDS-PRICE - MWF 12:00 pm - 12:50 pm

* Core Curriculum Justice Attribute
* Justice Minor Credit
Women & Gender Studies Credit 

This course examines basic questions concerning human values, social organization, and the principles of political association.  It has a special concern to examine modern political issues and their historical antecedents.

 

PHI 291 - PHILOSOPHY OF ART & BEAUTY - FOREST - MWF 10:00 am - 10:50 am

A study of various approaches to thinking philosophically about art and beauty, with special emphasis on the historical variety of aesthetic theories.

 

 PHI 300-LEVEL and 400-LEVEL COURSES 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least one PHI 200-level course

 

PHI 301 A - ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY - PERKINS -  TR 1:00 pm - 2:15 pm

European Studies Credit 

An examination of principal trends in ancient philosophy in the West from the Preplatonic Greeks through Plato and Aristotle to the beginning of the Medieval period.

 

PHI 305A ASL - CONTEMPORARY CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY - LOUGHEAD - TR 9:00 am - 10:15 am

Core Curriculum Justice Attribute
Women & Gender Studies Credit
Service Learning Required

Students will become familiar with various movements in contemporary continental philosophy including: phenomenology, existentialism, postmodernism, critical theory, feminism and deconstruction.  Students will analyze these movements and ideas in relation to each other and to the current world.  Students will also explore and scrutinize these contemporary movements in relation to how they understand themselves and the formation of the subject.  Such analysis requires intense critical thinking skills: to read and interpret text; to think broadly about the world around them and investigate their assumptions about it; to dissect ideas; to contemplate the issues of self, gender, language, power, freedom, death and ethics; and to extrapolate upon how various theoretical views shape our world and are shaped by our world.

 

PHI 399 A - ETHICS, JUSTICE, & PROBLEM of POVERTY - NEWHOUSE - TR 2:30 pm - 3:45 pm
PHI 399 B - ETHICS, JUSTICE, & PROBLEM of POVERTY - SIMMONDS-PRICE - W 6:00 pm - 8:45 pm

* Core Curriculum Capstone Course

This core capstone is open to all students from all majors. We will consider several rival versions of our moral self-understanding and several rival versions of how to address contemporary moral problems. Our goal is to apply these different approaches to the problem of world poverty. Since by current estimates, over 1.7 billion people live in absolute poverty (less than $1.25 per day), how do different economic approaches to these problems entail different conceptions of justice and of the living well? The course considers our position as moral beings in a poverty stricken world.