Classics Faculty Scholarship

The Classics faculty's books, translations, commentaries, book chapters, articles, and reviews have earned an international readership.

Thomas Banchich, PhD

The subjects of Banchich’s publications include Greek and Roman intellectual history and historiography, Alexander the Great, Late Antiquity, Byzantium, and the history of classical scholarship. His commentaries on Book I of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and the Pinax of Cebes are part of the Bryn Mawr Commentaries series. He has edited, translated, and produced commentaries on numerous fragmentary historians for Brill’s New Jacoby, is the author of the standard English translations of the Epitome de Caesaribus, and with Jennifer Meka, the Breviarium of Festus. He is a co-founder of the scholarly website De Imperatoribus Romanis and established the series Canisius College Translated Texts, for which Canisius students produce or collaborate in the production of previously un-translated Greek and Latin authors. In 2009, Banchich was the recipient of the Canisius College Faculty Scholarship Award for his book The History of Zonaras: From Alexander Severus to the Death of Theodosius the Great. His most recent book is The Lost History of Peter the Patrician.


Kathryn Williams, PhD

Williams’ research focuses primarily on Roman historiography and Latin prose. She has published on Sallust, Tacitus, and Pliny the Younger, and she most recently contributed chapters on the interrelationship between Tacitus’ works and Juvenal’s Satire 4 (Latin Historiography and Poetry in the Early Empire: Generic Interactions, Brill 2010) and on Tacitus’ senatorial embassies (A Companion to Tacitus, Blackwell 2012). Her forthcoming publications include "Virgil's Georgic Bacchus" and "Gaul in Sallust's 'Bellum Catilinae.'"


Stephen Russell, PhD

Russell has translated all the fully extant Greek tragedies and is currently preparing a translation of Seneca's Thyestes. He also is working on a textbook on Greek and Latin medical terminology.


Erin Warford, PhD

Warford's research involves Greek and Roman myth and religion, processions and pilgrimage, landscape archaeology, sacred landscapes, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and other digital approaches to the ancient world. Her forthcoming publications include “Performing Piety: A Phenomenological Approach to Athenian Processions” and “The Multipolar Polis: The Border Sanctuaries of Attica at the Dawn of Democracy”